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Allura fiber cement siding

This topic contains 15 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  DirtyWhiteBoy 1 month, 1 week ago.

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  • #723378

    Hello everybody. I am about to install Alluras Fiber cement siding on an existing one story house. The current siding over the sheathing is the old asbestos shingles.Since it is Asbestos, Removing it would be quite costly and is out of budget for this project. The shingles are lapped so the surface is not flat. Installing directly over the existing shingle siding would probably not be a good idea because of the uneven surface. I picture thousands of shims and headaches trying to do it that way.

    Looking at the options, one idea we came up with was going over the Shingle siding with 3/8- 1/2 PT Plywood with house wrap over the plywood. Has anyone ever encountered a situation like this before? If so, what was the best way you found to Install Fiber cement siding over Existing shingles? I spoke with a rep. for Allura and told him my idea. He said they would consider it an acceptable solution to correct the uneven surface issue. I just want to see what some pros think about this.

    To anyone who replies, thank you for taking the time to give your input.

    #723380

    Doobie
    Pro

    I’ve seen of plenty of laying a second row of roofing shingles, which myself I disapprove of but is not illegal and maybe that’s where you are getting your idea from to add a second row of siding @elitehomes, but never seen or heard of laying a second row of lap siding over a previous install.

    First, whatever warranty the manufacturer would have, you’d be losing it doing it this way, that’s for sure. But the most likely reason you can’t do this is for where the siding will meet corner trim and around window casings that the existing such won’t be proud enough to accomodate another layer of siding’s butt ends to go up against and subsequently be properly caulked.

    Another factor would be in finding where the studs are located which is the preferred method of where to drive your nails or screws to fasten your siding especially with what is much heavier siding than other alternatives such as is highly advised to do so as much as possible with FC siding. You can miss the odd stud, but missing a lot of them is not ideal as it compromises its ability to withstand strong winds especially if your sheathing is not good and solid ply.

    And what is between the existing siding and the sheathing? Is there a still decent housewrap there? All FC installs call for a good housewrap underneath it to allow moisture to slide away that may get under the siding. The back side of FC is not as weather/water resistant as its painted outside face, and one thing you cannot have with FC siding is having it be subject to being water exposed for prolonged periods where it is wet on non face finished areas of it, hence why they recommend none be closer to 8 inches from ground or to keep at least a 2 inches away from where roofs meet against adjacent walls from the shingles of a roof, and also to edge paint all cut butt ends even if those ends will be caulked over where they meet trim or window casings. Those are the protocols with James Hardie FC lap siding, other brands of FC siding may differ.

    Just get the old stuff off. I can’t advise you to undertake an unsafe practice, but asbestos is only dangerous if it is airborne. If it can be removed without breaking it and potentially releasing the asbestos particulates, it poses no danger. I’ve never removed any kind of asbestos containing siding, so I don’t know if this is feasible.

    Is it too far gone to be painted over? Millions of people have asbestos laden materials in their homes that was installed decades ago when asbestos was all the rage in construction materials particularly mostly used in various insulation materials, as long as you don’t damage it or break it apart, you don’t need to remove it, it poses no danger left intact. Another question, how certain are you the siding does have asbestos in it?

    #723411

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Oh yeah that’s not fun with the asbestos siding
    I’ve seen and heard of some people siding over them

    Personally I don’t know or have any experience in this
    Hopefully some of the pros
    @chadm @dirtywhiteboy @warren6810 @roninohio @sorpa @cb @miamicuse
    kurt@welkerhomes.com can add more information
    Sorry if I didn’t tag more people. Had to get back to work

    #723419

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I have seen the old sidings overlayed with 3/8″ fanfold insulation to smooth out the uneven surface. In your case with the asbestos I think the plywood or OSB is a better choice to better encapsulate the material.

    In our area, we have had reasonable pricing to remove the asbestos. probably close to what it would cost to sheet over the material.

    #723421

    Doobie
    Pro

    Oh yeah that’s not fun with the asbestos siding
    I’ve seen and heard of some people siding over them

    Is it flat? I was thinking it was like lap plank siding. Or is it more like wall shingles crap from the 60’s that is similar to asphalt shingles but that has a printed facade or style that simulates blocks or large shingles in appearance?

    This is why pics when posting what one is dealing with is so important. Avoids confusion. I’m thinking now all my typing was for naught.

    Is it this stuff or similar?

    Attachments:
    #723425

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Oh yeah that’s not fun with the asbestos siding
    I’ve seen and heard of some people siding over them

    Is it flat? I was thinking it was like lap plank siding. Or is it more like wall shingles crap from the 60’s that is similar to asphalt shingles but that has a printed facade or style that simulates blocks or large shingles in appearance?

    This is why pics when posting what one is dealing with is so important. Avoids confusion. I’m thinking now all my typing was for naught.

    Is it this stuff or similar?

    Yup that’s what we have around some of the older homes here , it’s not as pronounced as some of the siding.

    #723427

    Doobie
    Pro

    Oh yeah that’s not fun with the asbestos siding
    I’ve seen and heard of some people siding over them

    Is it flat? I was thinking it was like lap plank siding. Or is it more like wall shingles crap from the 60’s that is similar to asphalt shingles but that has a printed facade or style that simulates blocks or large shingles in appearance?

    This is why pics when posting what one is dealing with is so important. Avoids confusion. I’m thinking now all my typing was for naught.

    Is it this stuff or similar?

    Yup that’s what we have around some of the older homes here , it’s not as pronounced as some of the siding.

    That’s where I’ve seen tons of it, was when I was younger travelling with my parents thru rural areas of Quebec. There was a ton of that stuff I recall in Val d’Or where an aunt and uncle lived we used to go visit. Even as a kid, I thought it was ugly and drab. Had no idea til this morning it was made with asbestos added to it, if this is in fact what we are talking about has asbestos in it.

    #723428

    roninohio
    Pro
    New Franklin, OH

    My dad was a asbestos worker all his life and told me that anytime you have to remove it to soak it with water so no dust gets airborne . He also said it was better to encapsulate it than to remove it.
    I would try to find out if for sure it is asbestos . If not just rip it off. If it is asbestos I would follow @ kurt@welkerhomes.com advice .
    We have sided over it before with vinyl siding.

    #723431

    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    I replaced the windows on a house a few years back and it was covered in asbestos siding. It was a major renovation and the owner wanted to sell it IIRC. He asked me do the siding by removing the asbestos and replacing it with vinyl and I said thank you very much but not interested.
    I looked it up on google map a minute ago and it looks like they painted the asbestos siding. Not changed for sure.

    #723435

    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    Have never sided over asbestos siding. I have seen it done with vinyl, but I would be very hesitant to do it with Fiber Cement.

    #723540

    Thanks for the responses everybody here is a picture of the siding currently over the sheathing.

    #723542

    My initial plan when brainstorming with this idea was to screw some 1/2 PT plywood over the shingle siding, screwing the plywood to the studs. There is felt paper behind the existing siding acting as a house wrap. I was still planning on putting a layer of tyvek over the new plywood just for good measure. The window trim and corner trim is getting replaced with the cellulose trim. In addition, I planned on having to use longer screws to get through the new plywood,existing shingle siding, and sheathing behind that to catch the studs. I figure that thickness at about 1.5″ of material to get to the studs not counting the siding.

    It seemed like a feasible option to get around having to hire an asbestos removal team, but reading your response as well as the others it is alot of extra work to install the FC siding. Thanks for the detailed reply, I am going to weigh the options. The existing siding isn’t in terrible shape, could definitely use a pressure washing and paint job. We just really like the look of the FC lap siding versus the wide existing Shingle siding.

    #723543

    Yes it is very similar to that. Minus the waves

    #723548

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    @elitehomes
    Your right , it doesn’t look all that bad , maybe like you mentioned , a pressure washer and a good coat of quality paint.
    And I think if you changed the window trim and cleaned them up
    It should change the look for sure

    Looking forward to seeing you what you decide to do.

    #723808

    CB
    Pro

    I’d be cautious about layering methods that would trap water vapor within the wall. It isn’t just about denying liquid water entry… it is about permitting water vapor from condensation to permeate out, and or drain down through a well managed air gap, and escape the wall.

    Flashing and trim around the windows would also factor heavily in the planning process, especially considering whether or not those old windows are slated for upgrade in the future.

    #723907

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I would prime and paint and run.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

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