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All Things LADDER

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  • #754484
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I recently purchased a LITTLE GIANT KING KOMBO ladder which is an A-frame convertible to extension ladder able to work in 6′ or 10′ configurations and has a flip out pod that allows it to lean into inside corners, outside corners or onto studs. There were some interest in additional discussions about ladders so here it is.

    I have quite a few ladders already, from A frames, to extensions, to multifunctionals. Sadly they all have issues. It would be great if someone can come up with something that is truly multifunctional and practical, but there isn’t such an animal, YET.

    A frames are great for general use around the house. Painting, sheetrock, soffits, ceiling fixtures etc…

    Extensions are used to reach up high. Getting on roofs, windows, exterior painting, putting up shutters on the second floor, cleaning gutters…the thing about extension, is you really need different sizes, 12′, 16′, 18′, 22’….you don’t want to use an 18′ to get to 12′, as that ladder is to heavy to be used in all cases.

    Multifunctionals are easier to transport due to the ability to collapse. Years ago the multifunctionals are folding ones that are “W” shaped. Today it’s mostly “V” shaped with an inner ladder and an outer ladder that can be separated. The issues with these ladders are (1) They are not that comfortable to stand on for a long time as the rungs are usually skinny and round unlike standard ladders the rungs are flat and wider, and (2) If you use them as an A frame the top is a pair of hinges, there is nothing on top to insert hammers, screw drivers, chisels, fasteners and parts. Imagine having to install a ceiling fan on one of those there is no room to rest anything and it’s a PIA to use. Instead of carrying a multifunctional around, I paid extra to have an A-frame at each rental.

    The King Kombo is kind of a hybrid, it’s a leaning, an A-frame and an extension.

    That’s not why I bought it. I bought it because in an A-frame mode there is a work platform on top. This flip out work platform is shaped such that it can lean into insider and outside corners, or the middle will just fit a 2X stud.

    Will see if this one will be my go to ladder…

    There are also ladder accessories that are quite useful. The down side is a lot of these accessories can be as expensive as the ladders themselves, ladders may go on sale, the accessories rarely do.

    Typical accessories are work platforms, stabilizers or standoffs, or levelers.

    Now Little Giant has a multifunctional ladder that comes with an adjustable leveler.

    or you can buy levelers yourself and attach them to your ladder. Like these:

    or these:

    There are also stabilizers designed specifically for soft uneven grounds.

    As well as special adjustable stair levelers.

    Do you have any of these ladders or accessories that you care to share your experience?

    #754492
    Warren6810
    Moderator
    Akron, OH

    I don’t think any of those add ons are OSHA compliant. Not a big deat for a homeowner, but for me they are a no go. Not to mention the time to put them on and take them off.

    As for the multi ladders, I personally do not like them. If you can only afford one ladder though, they likely make a good choice. Like most tools, when a tool tries to perform many functions, it rarely does any of them well.

    #754493
    JimDaddyO
    Pro
    Wawa, ON

    I have a 17′ convertable ladder. Almost an exact copy of the Little Giant. I got it at Canadian Tire for about half the price. It is very handy. The one thing I don’t like is the diagonal braces where you can only put one foot on the rung. That may be specific to me and my bad knee as I could only get on the roof of the old place by keeping my bad leg on the ladder and reaching with the other. Switching feet on that rung was a pain.

    The other thing is the narrow rungs are hard on the feet working on it. I prefer the wider ones of a step ladder, but even they can make my feet sore.

    Overall though, they are a great ladder because they fold small, reach a decent distance, and can be used straight or step ladder. The other feature I like is that if you put one side one rung lower, you can put it tight against a wall or adjust it for standing on stairs.

    My You Tube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA5AretE3xPoVDV61AxUdUA

    I don't do a fast job. I don't do a slow job. I do a half fast job.

    #754505
    GTokley
    Pro
    Belleville, ON

    I have a 17′ convertable ladder. Almost an exact copy of the Little Giant. I got it at Canadian Tire for about half the price. It is very handy. The one thing I don’t like is the diagonal braces where you can only put one foot on the rung. That may be specific to me and my bad knee as I could only get on the roof of the old place by keeping my bad leg on the ladder and reaching with the other. Switching feet on that rung was a pain.

    The other thing is the narrow rungs are hard on the feet working on it. I prefer the wider ones of a step ladder, but even they can make my feet sore.

    Overall though, they are a great ladder because they fold small, reach a decent distance, and can be used straight or step ladder. The other feature I like is that if you put one side one rung lower, you can put it tight against a wall or adjust it for standing on stairs.

    I thinking about getting convertible ladders. I see Cdn Tire has them on sale again this week. For all use ladder I think it would be a good ladder to have.

    Greg
    Do More of What Makes You Happy

    #754507

    I definitely like the little giant ladder , I eventually would like to pick one up , and eventually replace my heavier aluminum 24 ft extension ladder for a lighter fiberglass one , the 7 foot ladder is not so bad , just figured I’d get the little giant one especially when working on lights lol

    #754508
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I don’t think any of those add ons are OSHA compliant. Not a big deat for a homeowner, but for me they are a no go. Not to mention the time to put them on and take them off.

    OSHA does not do product or accessory approvals. They develop safety standards on how to work to minimize hazards. In that sense what OSHA would do is to say you must use a ladder this way but not that way. That you should have three points of contact with the ladder at all times (two feet one hand or two hand one foot); you must lean the ladder at a 4:1 slope; you must use a harness in these situations etc etc etc…A ladder by itself wouldn’t be OSHA compliant or approved by itself, if the ladder is rated for 250 pounds and a worker who is 250 pounds get on it with a 50 pound concrete, then this is OSHA non-compliant. Ladder accessories can be meet OSHA requirements as long as they are used correct in accordance with the manufacturer’s design and guidelines. A ladder stabilizer is fine, resting the stabilizer on a paper thin aluminum gutter or window glass is not recommended by the manufacturer and hence it’s not OSHA compliant.

    NIOSH on the other hand do product certification. Like the PPE or N93, K95 masks etc…those are NIOSH standards.

    #754545
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    Do you have any of these ladders or accessories that you care to share your experience?

    I have a 20′ Werner and a 24′ Featherlite as extension ladders. Both fiber glass.
    I use a Werner stabilizer for both of them. This model

    Highly recommended.
    Rubber covers for both of them to protect the brick, stone, siding etc.
    I have one of those aluminum giants sold by canadiantire under their brand. A 21′. Very sturdy and less than half price of a giant.
    As a stair leveler I use multiples of 2X6 or bigger. That aluminum stair leveler ( picture under the little giant) I find it too expensive.
    I’ll take a picture tomorrow if I don’t forget.

    #754546
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    Very interesting the ladder aide system.
    I googled it and what do you know, they are right here in Montreal. I have to pay them a visit. Always problems with the stairs.

    #754550
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Wow so much info I never knew about ladders.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #755536
    Clev08
    Pro

    Hopefully someone has experience with or at least know more about telescoping ladders than I do. I’m hoping to get a 10.5 ft telescoping ladder to keep in my camper. My roof is 9’ 8” off the ground and I’d like to have a way to get on the roof while we are camping without having to bring my bulky 17 ft multifunction ladder.
    Should I be looking for a specific brand that works better than off brand versions or just find a cheap one because they all operate the same? Any inside is greatly appreciated!

    #755546
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I do not personally have any experience with these telescoping ladders. I have seen them being used by inspectors or estimators. I have also heard stories about them collapsing but don’t know if it’s exaggerating.

    I understand the appeal which is the portability.

    For a camper may be it’s fine, since it’s light duty. I would never go up on such a ladder carrying a five gallon bucket full of tar or mortar mix.

    I would read up on reviews and see what others dislike about it. I have those multifunctional ladders too, but I rarely use them, because they are not that practical either. As an A-frame they are not too helpful without an additional work platform to rest parts on. As an extension ladder the bottom not having those pivot feet to bite into the ground give me pause.

    I will tell a story that happened may be ten years ago, I have a multifunctional ladder, not the current style where it’s actually two ladders one inside the other which you slide to length. The one I used to have was a folding one, with four segments and you fold them like a letter M. If you unfold the outside segments it’s an A frame if you unfold all segments it’s an extension ladder. I was going up on to the roof on one of those. Half way up the ladder folded, at a hinge, the hinges just decided to unlock by itself. I fell. Good thing I was lazy, I parked my truck there and set the ladder just next to it. When I fell I happen to drop onto the hood of the truck and I rolled over the hood and dropped to the ground. Twisted an ankle that’s all. Scared the heck out of me when a ladder collapsed like that because you had zero control, there is nothing to hold on to and nothing to break the fall. Since then I have a bit of a wobbly feeling going up ladders for years.

    My friend was putting up hurricane panels on a second floor window and a whole stack of those 20′ tall panels leaning against the exterior wall started sliding towards him while standing on a ladder, he came crashing down broke many bones with a ruptured lung. Working high is no fun.

    #755552

    I’ll say like @Miamicuse , I have only used the four part folding type like him , but ours was on gravel and we were not high off the ground , but I to don’t have confidence in the folding or multifunction ladders , maybe the best bet would be to try and find a supplier for fiberglass extension ladders , and see if you can get a 12 or 10 foot section , I know you’re concern is space saving , maybe just go with the four part sectional type like Sami mentioned. 🤷‍♂️ Good luck with that ,

    #755555
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    What about an integrated ladder permanently mounted on the side of the camper for the roof access? Would that be the most convenient, no need to store, or even to take out and put back a ladder?

    I remember another I read about those telescoping ladder that they are so light, that when you take your camper to some parks and open areas with high winds, people got stuck on the roof of the camper when the ladders got blown off the camper. I’ll make sure to have some fastening mechanism to help stabilize and stop the ladder from sliding and shifting.

    #755559

    What about an integrated ladder permanently mounted on the side of the camper for the roof access? Would that be the most convenient, no need to store, or even to take out and put back a ladder?

    I remember another I read about those telescoping ladder that they are so light, that when you take your camper to some parks and open areas with high winds, people got stuck on the roof of the camper when the ladders got blown off the camper. I’ll make sure to have some fastening mechanism to help stabilize and stop the ladder from sliding and shifting.

    Two great ideas 👍 that would be kinda embarrassing calling out for help stuck on the camper roof lol

    #755613
    Clev08
    Pro

    What about an integrated ladder permanently mounted on the side of the camper for the roof access? Would that be the most convenient, no need to store, or even to take out and put back a ladder?

    I remember another I read about those telescoping ladder that they are so light, that when you take your camper to some parks and open areas with high winds, people got stuck on the roof of the camper when the ladders got blown off the camper. I’ll make sure to have some fastening mechanism to help stabilize and stop the ladder from sliding and shifting.

    I don’t live the idea of mounting a permanent ladder just because I don’t know where the structural members are located to drill into, and I don’t really want to put holes in the fiberglass and risk moisture getting in and causing the wall to delaminate.

    Thanks for the tip on the ladder blowing over, I’ll probably order one closer to spring time and let you all know how I like it.

    #755618
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    #755635

    Best Ladder Reviews for 2021 | Dozens of Models Tested

    https://www.protoolreviews.com/best-ladder-reviews/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=get_high_on_the_years_best_ladders_plus_more_news_and_reviews&utm_term=2021-01-31

    Haha yeah I saw that email earlier today , you beat me to it 👍 looks like some good information

    #755641
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Camp Addict rated the following telescoping ladder the best for RV usages.

    Xtend and Climb Aluminum Telescoping Ladders

    Light and strong
    No-pinch design to collapse ladder
    3 sizes – 8.5′, 10.5′ & 12.5′ extension
    Home Series is ANSI Type II rated for 225 pounds
    Pro Series is ANSI Type IA rated for 300 pounds

    #755647
    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    telescoping ladders

    An extension ladder without shoes is a very dangerous thing. My opinion.
    These are the shoes

    A telescopic ladder doesn’t have those features.

    #755719
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    telescoping ladders

    An extension ladder without shoes is a very dangerous thing. My opinion.

    These are the shoes

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe title=”Werner Shoe Kit 26-2 Extension Ladder Parts” type=”text/html” allowfullscreen=”” style=”max-width:100%” src=”https://read.amazon.ca/kp/card?preview=inline&linkCode=kpd&ref_=k4w_oembed_T0ab5Q9Xrgh26w&asin=B00E0O011A&tag=kpembed-20&#8243; width=”770″ height=”550″ frameborder=”0″></iframe></figure>
    A telescopic ladder doesn’t have those features.

    Only extension ladders have those. Even the heavy duty multi functional ladders do not have the pivoted feet. I agree those are the best and safest.

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