dcsimg

Aligining Miter saws for percise cuts.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 44 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #255650

    I was wondering what is the best Miter Saw to use for cutting accurate cuts. I’ve had a few “chop saws” for general carpentry but now I am getting into more detailed work. I have been looking at all the new Miter Saws out there and have read alot of reviews. Some say Hitachi is super accurate but it has a two-piece fence! I know that would be difficult to set accurately for cuts using both sides of the fence at once and each fence individually. Some say Makita is awesome, they do have one-piece fence but have sliding attachments that fit over each side of the fence for adjustable extensions and are a little sloppy until full tightened. And the fence just kind of sits on top of the table and attached by screws like Bosch. The DeWalt one-piece fence is NOT adjustable at all. It is sits firmly in place in machined grooves and has an adjustable detent plate that aligns the Saw Blade to the Fence, not the Fence to the Saw Blade. So what brand can be aligned for perfect cuts, or at least close to it? 90 degree cuts for sure.

    #255652

    What is your budget? That makes a big difference.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #255653

    Welcome @SonomaComa to BTP . Some guys say the top of the top is festools Saw .

    Always willing to learn .

    #255656
    RonW
    Moderator
    Holladay, Tn

    One of the very best is the Festool Kapex.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #255658

    What is your budget? That makes a big difference.

    That’s the first question anyone should ask themselves buying tools .

    Always willing to learn .

    #255659
    asevereid
    Pro
    Kamloops, BC

    I’m just going to say that most miter saws can be calibrated to near perfection with a little time and effort (albeit, some saws have some pretty substantial production flaws that makes it more difficult for the end user), and the higher the price point on the product, the easier it will (should) be to set and maintain those settings.
    For instance: I use a Makita LS1013…an older sliding compound miter saw.
    When I purchased it I set about checking the fences and blade alignment. Then I calibrated it using a drafting square and a four cut check. In the end it all came out pretty damn good, but I’ve had to check the saw fairly frequently after I’ve made bevel cuts to ensure that it’s still at 90°.

    Now, you take something like the new Bosch Axial Glide, or the Festool Kapex and ask their users about them; from what I’ve heard and read…most of them have calibrated their saws as well (though the Kapex apparently comes factory set to square most of the time) but have not had to make any adjustments over time.

    I guess what I’m trying to say is that there is no real “perfect” saw for your needs…with a little effort even your “chopsaw” can make near perfect cuts…but if you wish to skip all that you can get a newer saw with great factory settings and repeatable performance.

    Lurking Hit and Run poster.

    #255692
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    One of the very best is the Festool Kapex.

    Oh yes the Kapex is a top of the line tool!

    #255709

    I’ve been looking at the Bosch Axial Glide. I’m hoping it can be put on the list. Would really like to try that out.

    #255815

    Thanks for all the useful information. My budget is about $400.00. I was looking for a non sliding miter saw. I’ve also heard when it comes to accuracy a 10″ is a little better than a 12″. I used to think bigger is better. Now I’m looking for something that can be aligned well and has a stable arbor for smooth cuts.

    #255839
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    Not only ask how much, but what you want to cut.

    I tried out the kapex and it’s a great saw. I just felt it was not worth the 3X price tag of the competition.

    I ended up with the 12″ axial glide. after set up it’s perfect. Oh, and a good blade. Don’t forget to add that to your cost.

    I am now looking at a smaller 8.5″ saw for just smaller items and better portability. Most likely going with the Bosch CM8S

    I moved my makita dual slider to a framing only saw. You could set up it to be square, but it never stayed and was PITA to set up all the time.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #255843

    Thanks for all the useful information. My budget is about $400.00. I was looking for a non sliding miter saw. I’ve also heard when it comes to accuracy a 10″ is a little better than a 12″. I used to think bigger is better. Now I’m looking for something that can be aligned well and has a stable arbor for smooth cuts.

    You are correct. A 10″ blade will deflect less than a 12″. Also the rails on sliding saw is an area where you can get movement and affect the quality of the cut.

    For that price I would look at the Dewalt 10″. Their regualr miter saws are very solid and easy to adjust. We have a couple 12″ non-sliders still in use after 15 plus years. One is used just for framing, the other is still good enough for trim.

    http://www.dewalt.com/tools/machinery-miter-saws-dw713.aspx

    That model only has single bevel. Dewalts have always has good vertical cut capacity. The 10″ will cut 3-1/4″ base vertical. That means you won’t need the bevel.

    You really need to look at what you want to do with the saw. It is just as important as the price.

    Another option is the 8-1/2″ Bosch slider. There are a few people on here that could give you input on that saw @DirtyWhiteBoy.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #255848
    crotalusco
    Pro
    west bend, wi

    I’m just going to say that most miter saws can be calibrated to near perfection with a little time and effort (albeit, some saws have some pretty substantial production flaws that makes it more difficult for the end user), and the higher the price point on the product, the easier it will (should) be to set and maintain those settings.
    For instance: I use a Makita LS1013…an older sliding compound miter saw.
    When I purchased it I set about checking the fences and blade alignment. Then I calibrated it using a drafting square and a four cut check. In the end it all came out pretty damn good, but I’ve had to check the saw fairly frequently after I’ve made bevel cuts to ensure that it’s still at 90°.

    Now, you take something like the new Bosch Axial Glide, or the Festool Kapex and ask their users about them; from what I’ve heard and read…most of them have calibrated their saws as well (though the Kapex apparently comes factory set to square most of the time) but have not had to make any adjustments over time.

    I guess what I’m trying to say is that there is no real “perfect” saw for your needs…with a little effort even your “chopsaw” can make near perfect cuts…but if you wish to skip all that you can get a newer saw with great factory settings and repeatable performance.

    agreed any say can be adjusted to near perfect. However once the saw is spun in may not be perfect when you return to square. A one piece fence can be just as hard if not harder to make square when cutting from both sides or longer pieces. With a two fence system you set one side square to the blade then use a good straight edge to set the other. Some one piece systems are simply cast and not accurate from the factory. This can be corrected some by removing the fence placing it on your cast table saw bench and hitting it with a rubber mallet a few times.

    I would say the most important think yo look at are the preset stops. Once it is set at 90 see if you can push it one way or the other without releasing it. If it moves at all you will not be able to maintain any adjustments you make.

    Highest price doesnt always mean the best. I have a 20 year old delta that i paid around $100 for that right now would cut as square as anything out there. But again I do check and make any tuning i need to do regularly. You will have to check and adjust all of them from time to time, be sure to get a good straight edge and square. This is why most will simply use a precision miter gauge or miter sled on the table saw

    #255849
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    This reminds me I never did do an exact precise check and adjust on mine, I made a few cuts and tested them with a square and it seemed good. I really should do it again with both the miter and table saw with my glasses on and get serious, Good luck with your decision

    #255851
    thedude306
    Moderator
    Foam Lake, SK

    @Dabbs

    Remind me again, did you go with the 12″ or the 8.5″ and are you happy with it?

    I know you did lots of extreme birdhouse building with it.

    Brad T
    Self employed Pro since 2014!!

    #255854

    There are several great ways to check square. Here is an excellent article for any saw new or old.

    http://www.thisiscarpentry.com/2010/07/23/miter-saw-tune-up/

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #255867
    jdw1865
    Pro
    Dewey, OK

    Anybody have a link to a good set of instructions on adjusting a miter saw? I have checked/adjusted mine a time or two using a framing square. It worked for what I needed at the time but I am getting ready to do some finer work and need to do a better job of fine tuning.

    #255872
    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    I bought a little Makita slider 8 1/2″ recently pretty nice saw the light feature could have been better thought out as well as the dial. The light shines on side of the blade and can be blocked easy shadowing the work area.

    It came accurate and a with small plastic/acrylic triangle meant to check the saws alignment. Its handy if I dont mis place it. Its not something that needs to happen often.

    My older Dewalt 708 stays accurate. I became lazy checking it because whenever I check it, it reads good.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #255877

    @jdw1865 read my post above your question.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #255888
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I agree with the statements about adjusting a saw to square. Most saws will produce great results unless something is bent or it has an inherent flaw.

    I have the Makita Ls1016L and have been very happy with it. Some effort is required to produce “perfect” results…however, once set you’ll have the results you’ve been looking for.

    My old Dewalt DW703 still cuts beautifully as well. I would buy either saw again.

    Whatever saw you choose…make sure you have the proper tools to square it up. There are many methods of adjusting a saw, but you’ll still need precise measurement tools to determine if you’ve done it correctly.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #255898
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    @Dabbs

    Remind me again, did you go with the 12″ or the 8.5″ and are you happy with it?

    I know you did lots of extreme birdhouse building with it.

    I got the big 12 inch, And yeah I’m very happy with it. It’s a beast and a lot of fun to use

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 44 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
© Robert Bosch Tool Corporation 2014, all rights reserved.
queries. 0.403 seconds