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5" ro sander or rectangular sanders, which do you prefer?

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  • #379135
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I thought the sheet sanders from bosh are orbital sheet sanders.

    1297D 1/4-Sheet Orbital Finishing Sander

    Most sheet style sanders are just orbital and leave swirl marks. Random orbit leave less. Some people will opt for linear sanders that when used correctly leave no marks and best imitate hand sanding but of course a lot faster. There’s no sander out there that can do everything. For many, you need a few of them if you want to avoid some hand sanding.

    #379162
    amulder
    Pro
    London, ON

    Hmm, so how do the little triangular sanders that fit on the oscillating multi-tools fit into this?

    They just vibrate side-to-side, right? I’ve only used them a few times, so I have never really studied what kind of marks they might leave

    www.wordsnwood.com

    #379168
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I thought the sheet sanders from bosh are orbital sheet sanders.

    1297D 1/4-Sheet Orbital Finishing Sander

    Most sheet style sanders are just orbital and leave swirl marks. Random orbit leave less. Some people will opt for linear sanders that when used correctly leave no marks and best imitate hand sanding but of course a lot faster. There’s no sander out there that can do everything. For many, you need a few of them if you want to avoid some hand sanding.

    I have a 1/4 sheet sander I used once or twice but didn’t like the swirl marks so it mainly sits in a cupboard. I have 2 5″ ROS which get regular use.
    My old Bosch belt sander doesn’t get much use either but it’s nice to have in a pinch.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #379169
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    I’ve used my 12v oscillating tool for a bit of sanding and it feels even slower than 1/4 sheet sanders. But you can get into tighter corners that sheet sanders can’t.

    #379191
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I thought the sheet sanders from bosh are orbital sheet sanders.

    1297D 1/4-Sheet Orbital Finishing Sander

    Most sheet style sanders are just orbital and leave swirl marks. Random orbit leave less. Some people will opt for linear sanders that when used correctly leave no marks and best imitate hand sanding but of course a lot faster. There’s no sander out there that can do everything. For many, you need a few of them if you want to avoid some hand sanding.

    I have a 1/4 sheet sander I used once or twice but didn’t like the swirl marks so it mainly sits in a cupboard. I have 2 5″ ROS which get regular use.
    My old Bosch belt sander doesn’t get much use either but it’s nice to have in a pinch.

    I can agree with the belt sander. Linear sanding is my favorite method as far as producing a flawless surface….unfortunately, when using a belt sander, things an go sideways very quickly! It takes a good amount of practice to use one for fine work.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #379199

    I thought the sheet sanders from bosh are orbital sheet sanders.

    1297D 1/4-Sheet Orbital Finishing Sander

    Most sheet style sanders are just orbital and leave swirl marks. Random orbit leave less. Some people will opt for linear sanders that when used correctly leave no marks and best imitate hand sanding but of course a lot faster. There’s no sander out there that can do everything. For many, you need a few of them if you want to avoid some hand sanding.

    I only have a Makita Palm sander so I don’t know any other difference. What are the differences between what I have and the random orbital ones?

    Mine smooths things down and doesn’t leave swirl marks and I don’t have to pay attention like a belt sander.

    #379208
    Seven-Delta-FortyOne
    Pro
    The Emerald Triangle, Northern California

    I only have a Makita Palm sander so I don’t know any other difference. What are the differences between what I have and the random orbital ones?

    Mine smooths things down and doesn’t leave swirl marks and I don’t have to pay attention like a belt sander.

    That’s exactly what I have. A 1/4 sheet Makita, and a 4×24 Bosch belt sander.

    I’m kind of wondering where an RO would fit in.

    Delta

    Goin' Down In Flames........

    #379227

    All sandpapers leave marks from sanding. Get out a magnifying glass and take a look. Working your sanding through progressively smaller grits leaves a finer mark. For hardwood, I have seen the experts say 220 – 320 is a high as you need to go. If you want an even better finish, learn to use a card scraper in the end.

    #379273
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    All sandpapers leave marks from sanding. Get out a magnifying glass and take a look. Working your sanding through progressively smaller grits leaves a finer mark. For hardwood, I have seen the experts say 220 – 320 is a high as you need to go. If you want an even better finish, learn to use a card scraper in the end.

    That’s about the best finish you can hope for. Especially with figured wood.

    EDIT: I’m thinking with the threads lately about traditional methods; the card scraper is really the best way to achieve a fine finish.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #379291

    Hmm, so how do the little triangular sanders that fit on the oscillating multi-tools fit into this?

    They just vibrate side-to-side, right? I’ve only used them a few times, so I have never really studied what kind of marks they might leave

    They are a pain in the butt. I have some for my multi tool. Doesn’t hold a candle to my small Festool that has an interchangeable delta head. I think that one orbits.

    #379293

    Hmm, so how do the little triangular sanders that fit on the oscillating multi-tools fit into this?

    They just vibrate side-to-side, right? I’ve only used them a few times, so I have never really studied what kind of marks they might leave

    They are a pain in the butt. I have some for my multi tool. Doesn’t hold a candle to my small Festool that has an interchangeable delta head. I think that one orbits.

    All sandpapers leave marks from sanding. Get out a magnifying glass and take a look. Working your sanding through progressively smaller grits leaves a finer mark. For hardwood, I have seen the experts say 220 – 320 is a high as you need to go. If you want an even better finish, learn to use a card scraper in the end.

    My finish supplier has a 150 grit suggested limit. I don’t particularly like that, but I prefer the finish to grab solid than to get a call back. I don’t see any scratches at 150. I have tested right through to 600. I didn’t see any discernible difference, though 600 looks awesome raw.

    #379295
    RonW
    Pro
    Holladay, Tn

    All sandpapers leave marks from sanding. Get out a magnifying glass and take a look. Working your sanding through progressively smaller grits leaves a finer mark. For hardwood, I have seen the experts say 220 – 320 is a high as you need to go. If you want an even better finish, learn to use a card scraper in the end.

    I hope a person is not trying to get hard wood to take stain after using 320 grit paper. The wood starts feeling like glass when using paper that fine.

    Ron

    A Working Pro since 1994!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #379296

    I have only ever used ro sanders. I have some ooder Dewalts, a Porter Cable, a Festool Rotex and and ETS. I have used the Fein with the delta head for inside corners but it does leave marks.

    I think I want to add either the Festool dts400 or the Bosch 1/2 sheet sander next.

    For shop work I think I would like having a nice Dynabrade air sander.

    Andrew

    A Working Pro since 1995!

    Member since March 26, 2014.

    #379316

    I hope a person is not trying to get hard wood to take stain after using 320 grit paper. The wood starts feeling like glass when using paper that fine.

    Good point @RonW. I will quit at 220 grit if I am staining.

    #379317
    Brackers
    Pro
    Waterloo, Ontario

    I have both, the rectangular sander is noisier vibrates more in my hands and also the paper rips too easily. That being said it will take off more material for the larger jobs.
    ROS its a pleasure to use (As pleasurable as sanding can get) but can’t get in corners.
    My vote take both but use the ROS wherever you can.
    My ROS is a bosh, rectangular sander is a Milwaukie.

    Bob…

    #379321
    smallerstick
    Pro
    North Bay, ON

    I have both, the rectangular sander is noisier vibrates more in my hands and also the paper rips too easily. That being said it will take off more material for the larger jobs.
    ROS its a pleasure to use (As pleasurable as sanding can get) but can’t get in corners.
    My vote take both but use the ROS wherever you can.
    My ROS is a bosh, rectangular sander is a Milwaukie.

    Bob…

    Welcome back, Bob, and I agree entirely. ROS is as comfortable as it’s going to get.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can’t Be The Pro… Be The Poster you’d want to read.

    #379324

    Seems like everyone covered the bases pretty well. I am thinking about getting the 1/2 sheet Bosch.

    I got one of those as a reward awhile ago. I follow up my ROS sanding with the 1/2 sheet sander (220 grit normally). It leaves a very nice finish. The high Bosch ROS sander and 1/2 sheet are a great combo.

    Thanks for the confirmation with the sander. I think it will come in handy.

    #379326

    I have both, the rectangular sander is noisier vibrates more in my hands and also the paper rips too easily. That being said it will take off more material for the larger jobs.
    ROS its a pleasure to use (As pleasurable as sanding can get) but can’t get in corners.
    My vote take both but use the ROS wherever you can.
    My ROS is a bosh, rectangular sander is a Milwaukie.

    Bob…

    Love my Bosch ROS. For corners, I have a little B&D mouse sander that I expected to die years ago, but it just won’t die. Also use it for the jobs I refuse to risk a good sander on.

    Still haven’t tried the sanding pad on my OMT

    #379332
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I hope a person is not trying to get hard wood to take stain after using 320 grit paper. The wood starts feeling like glass when using paper that fine.

    Good point @RonW. I will quit at 220 grit if I am staining.

    I agree with this. The finest grits should be reserved for polishing clear coats rather than sanding. The higher you go, the less the stain soaks into the wood. Thus the color is lighter…and it takes longer/more coats to get the color you are looking for.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #379386
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    I’ve heard of some people using a card scraper on the clear coat instead of sanding it, has anyone tried to compare it to sanding?

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