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4100 vs. GTS1031

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  • #430513

    @jzmtl

    I’d recommend making some dust collection modifications to the 4100 if you get it. Once you get it out of the box and before you put it onto the stand would be the best time to flip it 180 and close up the bottom. Still haven’t had the time to do what I wanted with redoing the bottom with coroplast and flexible sheets to emulate what I saw on the GTS1031, but now I have some good ideas as to what I should do.

    There’s also the option of looking at the upcoming Skilsaw version of the GTS1031 which seems to be like an improved GTS1031 from looking at the press release. I took the 4100 personally since I don’t have enough space for a hybrid table saw.

    #430581
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Me neither, if I had the space I’d love a cabinet saw.

    I just realized it’s not a good idea to cut the protruding tip off the riving knife, since the height is such that at middle position it’s flush with top of a 10″ blade. Now I have to decide if I want to deal with removing the riving knife assembly each time I swap blades.

    #430874

    @jzmtl
    Kinda a crazy idea here that’d be maybe inadvisable since I haven’t tried it before but realized this:

    At one point my 4100 had the riving knife setup close to aligned but biased to the right on a 50T sawblade I had. When I swapped to another 40T blade I later fonud out that it was a different kerf with a little offset on the teeth (Long story, thought there was staples in the wood that I didn’t find and I just needed a rough cut) that made it so my riving knife more or less pushed the wood right up against the fence side and had a little less riving knife on the left side. The wood didn’t bind up but I thought it cut with more resistance until I noticed it was basically snug up against the fence.

    So I’m thinking, with 7-1/4″ blades and a half fence clamped onto the fence, would the gap between a 7-1/4″ blade and the riving knife tip be enough to just kind of “split” the wood right after it gets cut? Since the riving knife on the 4100 is approx 0.090″ and some 7-1/4″ sawblades have a 0.071″ kerf while others have a tighter 0.059″, that’s about less than a millimeter of deflection total. The thicker 7-1/4″ would give about 0.24mm of deflection on each side when center aligned with the blade and the thinner 7-1/4″ would give about 0.393mm of deflection on each side when center aligned with the blade. Would the cut bind up? There’s no fence on the right after the center of the sawblade like those half fences on European sliding saws so the piece being cut can deflect a little on both sides.

    Don’t test that theory out unless you think its safe. I don’t know how safe this would be to try out and if I were to do it it’d be with a bunch of stuff to prevent kickback and with a really small and long test piece you can hold onto the end and stop the cut in the middle. I’m serious, this is more or less a thought experiment on what the blade clearance is.

    #430882
    Calidecks64
    Pro
    Anaheim Hills, Cali

    I can’t get my Ryobi ts to die. When it does it will be replaced with the 4100

    #431051
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    @jzmtl
    Kinda a crazy idea here that’d be maybe inadvisable since I haven’t tried it before but realized this:

    I’ve only used a half fence/stop block with crosscut sled/miter gauge before so I don’t know how it’ll work for ripping. It might work in a pinch as a temporary solution, but long term wise it’s probably easier to just remove the riving knife assembly.

    Wish it came with a combo imperial/metric scale though, since I use both equally often.

    #431352
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I can’t get my Ryobi ts to die. When it does it will be replaced with the 4100

    The Ryobi may never die, you might as well replace it. You’ll like the upgrade.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #431591
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    So I had the 4100 and a bunch of accessories and blades in cart on Amazon but didn’t check out because I wasn’t sure on 4100 or 1031. Finally decided I’d just get the 4100 and be done with it. I went to check out just now and guess what, price went up by $50 this morning… #%@#…

    #431594

    Not usre about shipping, but KMS is cheaper than Amazon this week

    https://www.kmstools.com/bosch-10-portable-table-saw-136

    #431634
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Can’t see shipping cost on KMS without register, but I sent the link to amazon with their “tell us a lower price”, will see if they drop the price to match.

    #431640

    Can’t see shipping cost on KMS without register, but I sent the link to amazon with their “tell us a lower price”, will see if they drop the price to match.

    Ive got a kms account, and since Im in Montreal, same shipping as you
    68$ shipping, but no provincial sales tax

    Total 685.49 shipped, including tax

    #431655
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Can’t see shipping cost on KMS without register, but I sent the link to amazon with their “tell us a lower price”, will see if they drop the price to match.

    Ive got a kms account, and since Im in Montreal, same shipping as you
    68$ shipping, but no provincial sales tax

    Total 685.49 shipped, including tax

    Thanks, that’s a bit better than amazon’s current price. I’ll wait and see if they drop the price first.

    #453358

    For anyone that owns the 4100 or GTS1031 if you guys feel that the textured surface of the table is a little sticky or grabby try putting 2-3 layers of (furniture/general purpose, not automotive or cleaner wax) paste wax on. I just did that with my 4100 and I can get pieces of plywood to slide across the top with a push of a finger. The textured coating that Bosch puts on the table seems to work really well when you coat it with enough layers of wax. I thought it wouldn’t work as well and I heard some people had stripped off the coating on their 4100s to the bare aluminum to try to get the top slick. You don’t really feel the slickness until the 2nd or 3rd layer.

    #453361
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    On the saw I have, I ended up using polishing compound to smooth the top and it seemed to work well. When I get the 4100 I might try 1000 grit sandpaper to wet sand it, wrapped around a straight edge to keep the table surface flat of course.

    #453373

    @jzmtl

    With 3-4 layers of paste wax I could lightly flick a piece of plywood at the front of the table and it’d make it to the rear to the point it could fall off if I didn’t grab it. I think that’d be less effort since you can apply a layer within a few minutes and wipe it off within a few more minutes. The texture is surprisingly effective at retaining wax in the valleys once you build up a few layers.

    Give it a try before you sand it down.

    #453375
    jzmtl
    Pro
    Montreal, QC

    Will do, yeah the texture on 4100 is finer than the one on my current saw, which looks like was done with belt sander.

    #453451
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Good idea reflector.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #453467
    58Chev
    Pro
    Etobicoke, ON

    For anyone that owns the 4100 or GTS1031 if you guys feel that the textured surface of the table is a little sticky or grabby try putting 2-3 layers of (furniture/general purpose, not automotive or cleaner wax) paste wax on. I just did that with my 4100 and I can get pieces of plywood to slide across the top with a push of a finger. The textured coating that Bosch puts on the table seems to work really well when you coat it with enough layers of wax. I thought it wouldn’t work as well and I heard some people had stripped off the coating on their 4100s to the bare aluminum to try to get the top slick. You don’t really feel the slickness until the 2nd or 3rd layer.

    Great advice @Reflector, I think I’ll try that with my current Craftsman TS.

    “If you don’t pass on the knowledge you have to others, it Dies with you”
    — Glenn Botting

    #461789

    So, I got some time to do a few small projects this weekend, both woodworking and diy around the house (some trim), and that meant I got to spend some quality time with my new 4100-09

    As many of you know, I used to use a GTS1031 on the GTA500 folding stand. Until the end, I loved that saw, and will remain a strong advocate for it as a compact powerhouse

    Now I have the new bigger model, and I have both positive and less positive thoughts on it

    For the less positive side, dust collecting is terrible compared to the baby saw. I added a bottom plate with 4 inch port on a 14×14 base, front and rear sawstaches, and expanding insulation tape between the bottom plate and the saw. I then hooked it up to the dc on the rear port and the new bottom one, and hooked up my shopvac to the overarm NAINA blade guard (did not have the plumbing to branch from the same dc line). That made the dust collection very good, but the 1031 is decent without modifications

    On the other side of the equation, the rear extension came in real handy when ripping, and thats not an option on the 1031

    The 4100 is quieter by a lot and I love the soft start. With a new Tenryu gold blade, the noise was only barely audible over the howl of my dust collector and ridgid shop vac. The 1031 is pitched higher, so you hear more of a scream with it.

    As for power, both are insanely powerful for 15amp 110 saws, but the bigger fence on the 4100 makes it a bit easier to cut perfectly straight, which both puts less strain on the saw, and helps keep the cut clean and as measured. Both do this well, but its just a bit easier

    Blade changes are also much easier, being able to pull up a tab to lock the blade rotation(arbor lock, I think they call it) and I like the on-saw blade storage, athough I wish It was a hair longer so I could put on my full dado stack as well as a couple of specialty blades. Right now, I have a dedicated ripping blade (Freud glue-line rip), a dedicated crosscut blade (also freud) and an old Freud Diablo 50tooth combination that I keep for jobs where I dont want to gum up my good blades

    The miter gauge on each saw is no worse than any other one that comes with a saw, but I wish they had left the tabs on the back of the saw that the european version has – they have a miter gauge fence that stores onboard. I use an Incra Miter gauge anyways, but it would be nice to have a decent one that stores onboard

    Both stands are excellent, but in different ways. When cutting, both are rock solid and at a good height, and when stored, both shine in their own way. I like the gravity rise’s ability to snap into storage mode, and the ease of moving it out of the way. It works well in the 1-car garage shop it shares with a car. Takes more space then the 1031 with folding stand, but setup is much faster, and its easier to move it out of the way when needed. I might even keep it in the basement furnace room if I know I wont need it for a while

    #461828
    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    I too wax the top of my table saw. I learned this trick after making a cross cut sled for a previous saw. The wax allowed the plywood sled to slide effortlessly in the miter tracks.

    Thanks for the input Eric. It sounds like it might just come down to what Size of a saw a person is looking for as both are great options.

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #461858
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I too wax the top of my table saw.

    I use Top Coat myself. Got to get a coat on my TS that I started cleaning up of rust marks a few weeks ago but got put on hold.

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