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2×4 End Pieces?

This topic contains 43 replies, has 22 voices, and was last updated by  geordie99 2 years, 9 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 44 total)
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  • #476790

    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    with wood movement the gaps might get bigger or smaller throughout the seasons. However this company does it, they may be able to give you some pointers.

    http://kaswell.com/

    it does look nice though, probably would be more expensive than regular flooring for sure.

    #476844

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    If they were laid flat and allowed to dry without cupping I think the poly might prevent absorbing humidity.

    I dont think its a good idea, Its the weakest part of the grain and I could see dropping something on it being a problem.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #476848

    r-ice
    Pro
    Durham region, ON

    If they were laid flat and allowed to dry without cupping I think the poly might prevent absorbing humidity.

    I dont think its a good idea, Its the weakest part of the grain and I could see dropping something on it being a problem.

    unless they dropped a chisel, i think everything else will be fine, look at end grain cutting boards, they have stuff chopped and sliced and they usually do pretty good.

    #476867

    End grain boards are hardwood, not softwood; this project might look cool but unless you are doing it for yourself I think the labour costs would be too much.

    Will

    #476878

    TopNotch
    Pro
    elmwood park, NJ

    End grain is the weakest part of wood. Fibers are not bound together like flat or edge grain.

    Working Pro since 1993

    Tom M

    #476880

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    End grain boards are hardwood, not softwood; this project might look cool but unless you are doing it for yourself I think the labour costs would be too much.

    Yes that’s my exact thought, unless I’m missing something. What sort of glue would be used to adhere the wood end cuts?

    #476883

    Won’t this crack horribly as the wood expands and contracts with humidity, weather? Seems like a bad idea with end grain. That said, I really like that look.

    #476942

    Found another company that specializes in end grain flooring. They even claim it has been used for a long time and in fancy places. If this is the look you are going for, I would buy the pre are product. Most Pinterest posts are casual diyers who are trying to save a dollar and don’t realize the difference in quality let alone type of wood.

    http://www.kennebecwood.com

    Anything is possible if your wallet is thick enough ~ my father

    #476973

    redwood
    Pro

    Using 2×4 endcuts would be painfully slow, I would think.

    If the material was dry and solid it could work, but I think it’s a labor nitemare.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #476979

    MrFid
    Pro
    Sudbury, MA

    There are lots of problems I see, and they’ve been mentioned. You could probably do it, but why would you want to? More trouble than it’s worth. There are better ways to get a unique, rustic look if that’s what you’re after. Bricking, or wide roughcut barnwood would give a rustic look without as much trouble, either at install or later down the line.

    #476980

    Using 2×4 endcuts would be painfully slow, I would think.

    If the material was dry and solid it could work, but I think it’s a labor nitemare.

    I wonder if there is an engineered floor that has that design out there .

    Always willing to learn .

    #476990

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Especially since she THINKS it would be cheaper because of the material,

    Epoxy is expensive.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #476993

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    If they were laid flat and allowed to dry without cupping I think the poly might prevent absorbing humidity.

    I dont think its a good idea, Its the weakest part of the grain and I could see dropping something on it being a problem.

    If they are sealed in epoxy they aren’t absorbing anything or moving anywhere. Wood is used to laminate windsurfing and surfing boards and it’s the strongest martial they can use.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #477009

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    For most things the material part is the cheapest part of the total cost. It all depends on what you select. ceramic tile at a buck a SF costs the same to lay as ceramic tile you pay 6 bucks a SF, the same for hardwood. Cheap costs the same to install as more expensive exotics for the most part. A floor like that would have a ton of labor.

    #477069

    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    Especially since she THINKS it would be cheaper because of the material,

    Epoxy is expensive.

    Well with any HO they only consider the visible material / product. They never seem to think of fasteners / epoxy’s / grout / mud / whatever holds things together haha

    #477071

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Especially since she THINKS it would be cheaper because of the material,

    Epoxy is expensive.

    Well with any HO they only consider the visible material / product. They never seem to think of fasteners / epoxy’s / grout / mud / whatever holds things together haha

    Agreed ,, I know that one all to well.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #477074

    cranbrook2
    Pro
    Belgrave, Ontario , Canada

    It looks to be pretty popular these days , I would do a bit of reading up first before I would consider doing it .

    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=end%20grain%20flooring&qs=AS&form=QBIRMH&pq=end%20grain%20floor&sc=3-15&sp=1&sk=

    #477094

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I think I would seal all sides before installing if I were going to do it then epoxy over that.

    I was at a meeting in a barn that one of the Mayo brothers of the Mayo clinic fame had built on his farm. The floors where the horse stalls were, were white oak 4 x 6’s about a 6″ long all set in place with the end grain showing just like stone pavers. The barn is now a conference center. It was about a hundred years old. They used the oak because it was easier on the hooves of the horses than stone or concrete would have been. It was quite a striking floor. I wish I had taken a photo but I did find this one online. the oak is in the center and the outer edges that are diagonal are pavers.

    #477165

    jponto07
    Moderator
    Bloomington, IN

    Especially since she THINKS it would be cheaper because of the material,

    Epoxy is expensive.

    Well with any HO they only consider the visible material / product. They never seem to think of fasteners / epoxy’s / grout / mud / whatever holds things together haha

    Agreed ,, I know that one all to well.

    How large of an area would this floor be? I’m assuming we are talking about a couple thousand of dollars of epoxy…

    Jon P.
    Timber Carpentry & Construction
    https://www.facebook.com/timbercarpentry/
    Instagram

    #477207

    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    Especially since she THINKS it would be cheaper because of the material,

    Epoxy is expensive.

    Well with any HO they only consider the visible material / product. They never seem to think of fasteners / epoxy’s / grout / mud / whatever holds things together haha

    Agreed ,, I know that one all to well.

    How large of an area would this floor be? I’m assuming we are talking about a couple thousand of dollars of epoxy…

    She was looking to have around 220 sq ft done, but I think I’ve got her convinced on some nice rustic wood looking 6×24 tile.

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