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#2 TEAL TIME,,Lastest MAKITA TOOLS

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  • #728848
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    The more I use the rear handle blade left, and indeed, the more I use Makita tools in general, the more I want to “switch over” the rest of my tools onto this platform.

    Yes Makita makes good tools and they have quite an extensive catalog of tools that do just about everything.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #728850

    The more I use the rear handle blade left, and indeed, the more I use Makita tools in general, the more I want to “switch over” the rest of my tools onto this platform.

    Yes Makita makes good tools and they have quite an extensive catalog of tools that do just about everything.

    They haven’t always had a big line up like this , but man have they grown in the last decade easily

    Seeing what they offer , if I had to start over , it’s definitely going to be different.

    #728881
    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Seeing what they offer , if I had to start over , it’s definitely going to be different.

    Start with the coffee maker.

    #728890
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Wow that is a good deal Kevin! I will have look into thanks. Thanks for SKU number.

    No prob.

    #728947
    CB
    Pro

    Speaking of buying Maktia tools, on online tool retailer has a sale on right now where one can stack two different discounts together, with one of the discounts being 30% off (which by itself is nothing to sneeze at). This 30% off is on top of whatever sale discount (typically between 20-30%) may already apply to the tool without the coupon code.

    The coupon code is MKTWOOD30, and the other discounts which the coupon stacks on top of are on a tool by tool basis.

    The net result was that I saved $250 today, with a total spend of less than $300, including sales tax. Essentially a 50% net discount, as the tools that I applied the 30% off coupon to were already discounted by an average of 25%. It would have been net 60% discount, but the new ruling for sales tax tempered the total savings by about 8.5% All Shipping was free.

    From what I read, the deal expires today, but I don’t know what time. I bought from Tyler Tool, but I think the same deal applies to CPO Outlets.

    Well this turned out to be too good to be true.

    Tyler Tool cancelled both of my orders.

    I guess they didn’t like the deals that they themselves advertised.

    Shady. This is now the third tool etailer on the Do Not Do Business With list.

    By far, the fairest and most consistent Makita tool purchases have been from my local bricks and mortar tool store (local still meaning 80 miles away), and overseas (Europe, by mail). The only USA based online eTailer that stands completely behind their word and deed in my recent (past year) Makita purchasing experiences is Acme Tools.

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    #728953
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    Speaking of buying Maktia tools, on online tool retailer has a sale on right now where one can stack two different discounts together, with one of the discounts being 30% off (which by itself is nothing to sneeze at). This 30% off is on top of whatever sale discount (typically between 20-30%) may already apply to the tool without the coupon code.

    The coupon code is MKTWOOD30, and the other discounts which the coupon stacks on top of are on a tool by tool basis.

    The net result was that I saved $250 today, with a total spend of less than $300, including sales tax. Essentially a 50% net discount, as the tools that I applied the 30% off coupon to were already discounted by an average of 25%. It would have been net 60% discount, but the new ruling for sales tax tempered the total savings by about 8.5% All Shipping was free.

    From what I read, the deal expires today, but I don’t know what time. I bought from Tyler Tool, but I think the same deal applies to CPO Outlets.

    Well this turned out to be too good to be true.

    Tyler Tool cancelled both of my orders.

    I guess they didn’t like the deals that they themselves advertised.

    Shady. This is now the third tool etailer on the Do Not Do Business With list.

    By far, the fairest and most consistent Makita tool purchases have been from my local bricks and mortar tool store (local still meaning 80 miles away), and overseas (Europe, by mail). The only USA based online eTailer that stands completely behind their word and deed in my recent (past year) Makita purchasing experiences is Acme Tools.

    Another retailer had that same deal going on. I almost pulled the trigger on a new Miter saw to replace one that was stolen.

    I would call their customer service and complain. If the issue were their fault, a lot of times they will honor the deal or at least something close.

    #728963

    Speaking of buying Maktia tools, on online tool retailer has a sale on right now where one can stack two different discounts together, with one of the discounts being 30% off (which by itself is nothing to sneeze at). This 30% off is on top of whatever sale discount (typically between 20-30%) may already apply to the tool without the coupon code.

    The coupon code is MKTWOOD30, and the other discounts which the coupon stacks on top of are on a tool by tool basis.

    The net result was that I saved $250 today, with a total spend of less than $300, including sales tax. Essentially a 50% net discount, as the tools that I applied the 30% off coupon to were already discounted by an average of 25%. It would have been net 60% discount, but the new ruling for sales tax tempered the total savings by about 8.5% All Shipping was free.

    From what I read, the deal expires today, but I don’t know what time. I bought from Tyler Tool, but I think the same deal applies to CPO Outlets.

    Well this turned out to be too good to be true.

    Tyler Tool cancelled both of my orders.

    I guess they didn’t like the deals that they themselves advertised.

    Shady. This is now the third tool etailer on the Do Not Do Business With list.

    By far, the fairest and most consistent Makita tool purchases have been from my local bricks and mortar tool store (local still meaning 80 miles away), and overseas (Europe, by mail). The only USA based online eTailer that stands completely behind their word and deed in my recent (past year) Makita purchasing experiences is Acme Tools.

    That stinks , I can’t believe they could do that , what happened to the customer is always right , can you complain to the head office or bring this issue up with the management.
    Good luck if you decide to go forward with the order.

    #728974
    Doobie
    Moderator

    When I bought my lightly used Makita wheelbarrow recently at the Makita service center, the lowest price they were willing to sell it to me was dealer cost, which was around 40% less than the MSRP. So if by a fault of a retailer not having put any curb in place to avoid stacking of discounts they would be losing money at this allowing a 50% discount. I can see why they would have cancelled such orders. No retailer is obligated to sell anybody anything if they discover there is a pricing/discounting error.

    While quite often a retailer will allow such to happen on a case by case error with honouring a pricing error, with social media nowadays, an online fiasco like this could have easily have turned into thousands of erroneous orders real fast.

    Just as an example, when Festool offered the Pro 5 sander for $129 a few years ago which was essentially the same as a regular sander that sells for $300, Atlas Machinery in Toronto only had it available on their site for just a few days and in speaking with them over the phone shortly thereafter, I was told they had sold themselves nearly 5000 sanders before Festool asked them and all other retailers to stop taking orders for them. Took some people close to 6 months til they received their Pro 5 sanders. No wonder.

    I had something very similar happen a couple of years ago with Amazon.ca with a stacked discouting error. There was a one day only sale on any tool(s) sold by Amazon where if you spent over certain thresholds a 5% 10% or 15% discount would be applied entering one of three different discount codes.

    Some fellow on another forum posts that you can stack the discounts as long as the overall price covers all the thresholds combined for an overall 30% on your full order PLUS, this discounting worked on Festool items which Festool has strict rules about not allowing any discounts on unless it is accross the board for all Festool retailers.

    I went and ordered two sanders myself and was thrilled about the prospect of getting them 30% off, although I knew this was not only a stacking error happening, but also against Festool retailer rules and obligations of Festool retailers.

    While I read some got their such Festool tools with no changes from their stacked savings from what was their stock on hand at the time at Amazon, others like myself had their items on back order until they received more product from Festool. Two months or so later, I get an email from Amazon informing me that unfortunately they could not fulfill my order.

    I wasn’t surprised my order got cancelled and since then, I don’t see that they carry any Festool as sold direct by Amazon.ca since that time. Can’t say I was pissed off, just a tad disappointed that I didn’t get the deal which I really knew shouldn’t be happening to begin with.

    The retailer margin on Festool is around 30% from what I understand, so they wouldn’t be making any money allowing that amount of discount, but obviously Amazon was still trying to fulfill what I bought nonetheless and was basically being stopped in doing so by Festool themselves once they caught wind of what they’d allowed to happen.

    #728993
    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Speaking of buying Maktia tools, on online tool retailer has a sale on right now where one can stack two different discounts together, with one of the discounts being 30% off (which by itself is nothing to sneeze at). This 30% off is on top of whatever sale discount (typically between 20-30%) may already apply to the tool without the coupon code.

    The coupon code is MKTWOOD30, and the other discounts which the coupon stacks on top of are on a tool by tool basis.

    The net result was that I saved $250 today, with a total spend of less than $300, including sales tax. Essentially a 50% net discount, as the tools that I applied the 30% off coupon to were already discounted by an average of 25%. It would have been net 60% discount, but the new ruling for sales tax tempered the total savings by about 8.5% All Shipping was free.

    From what I read, the deal expires today, but I don’t know what time. I bought from Tyler Tool, but I think the same deal applies to CPO Outlets.

    Well this turned out to be too good to be true.

    Tyler Tool cancelled both of my orders.

    I guess they didn’t like the deals that they themselves advertised.

    Shady. This is now the third tool etailer on the Do Not Do Business With list.

    By far, the fairest and most consistent Makita tool purchases have been from my local bricks and mortar tool store (local still meaning 80 miles away), and overseas (Europe, by mail). The only USA based online eTailer that stands completely behind their word and deed in my recent (past year) Makita purchasing experiences is Acme Tools.

    This is just crazy. I can’t say I have ever heard of someone doing this. This really too bad.

    Greg

    #729123
    CB
    Pro

    No retailer is obligated to sell anybody anything if they discover there is a pricing/discounting error.

    If your opinion was anything close to operative law, then that would invite any retailer, at any time, for any reason, to simply claim that any price, even a price made after the fact of entering into a contract for sale, was oops, our bad, a mistake, and thus that retailer would be excused for unilaterally breaching a contract of sale, and cancelling it.

    In such a world, consumers could be induced to enter into a purchase agreements with retailer A (the lying retailer) over retailer B (the truthful retailer), and where time is of the essence in the delivery of goods procured, suffer a substantial loss when the lying retailer A renigs, after the opportunity to buy from retailer B sunsets.

    I don’t know what the laws are in Canada, but that’s not how it works in the United States, nor Australia.

    Since this purchase happened in the US, and both parties to the transaction are also in the US, let’s focus on US Statutes and the policy guidance of the agency authorized by Congress to interpret and enforce them: The Federal Trade Commission.

    But first, a review of the facts and circumstances of this case (and I’ll just use the Makita stapler as a singular example for this illustration).

    TylerTool advertised an “ADDITIONAL 30% OFF” was available for all Makita tools identified as qualifying tools on a specific webpage, for a limited 3 day period of time, and the 30% discount was to be applied to the normal selling prices in the shopping cart if (and only if) the coupon code was entered in the appropriate box on the shopping cart.

    TylerTool advertised this discount publicly, both within and outside of TylerTool’s online properties, by prominently placing conspicuous announcements for the Additional 30% off on it’s home page, as well as prominently placing conspicuous Advertising in both the top line and the right hand box of Google, that appeared when Google users entered “Makita” in the search box.

    TylerTool listed the Makita XST01Z stapler as a qualifying tool on the special webpage of Makita tools for which the additional 30% off coupon code would work.

    TylerTool identified the list price of the tool ($229.99) with a line through that list price, and then prominently displayed their selling price of the tool ($184.31) in red letters, in bolder print, and in larger font, and further stated, also in red letters “You Save 20%”. This advertised discount is without regard to the coupon code that can only be applied at the check out phase.

    The specific details, such as “You Save 20%”, and “Save an Additional 30%”, and the red letters, the bold ink, the larger font, the line through the original list price, the requirement to type in a coupon code… are all very important details when it comes to the law, because these details are material matters of consumer inducement.

    In the administration of Truth in Advertising Laws, the FTC views both the express and the implied claims, and in this case, the evidence is very clear, as all the claims are expressed plainly, down to the percentage of savings that a consumer can expect, which leads (or misleads) a reasonable consumer to buy from one retailer over a competitor.

    Advertising is regulated by both federal and state law. It is unlawful to mislead or deceive in advertising, in details about the product, or the price, including any sales price.

    Back to the specific facts… I put the stapler (advertised at 20% off list) in my cart, and applied the coupon code (advertised at 30% off of all qualifying items in the cart, and the stapler qualified) to the cart, and arrived at a final price of $129.02, which was $100.88 off of list.

    TylerTool accepted my payment, processed the order, generated an Order Number, produced a receipt, and sent me a confirmation email and invoice. Done deal. Or so I thought. A week and a half go by, and no stapler.
    So I called TylerTool, and come to find out they cancelled the order… essentially unilaterally canceling the contract of sale that they and they alone defined all of the terms to at the outset.

    But it gets better, and here is where TylerTool made the biggest error. They very happily offered to generate a new order for me, for the same tool. The final price? $249.xx. For the same tool that was $129.02 on the previous order. I didn’t even hear the cents, as what was happening in that moment made no sense, just as Greg said. I might have been incensed, as bait and switch is a violation of the law… but given the insignificant dollar amount involved, I was only amused. I was going to ignore it and let the order go, but Kurt’s suggestion that I call, combined with the principle of the matter, motivated me to follow up.

    Three days, and three TylerTool representatives later (after my initial phone call), I now have a tracking number for this stapler at the originally agreed upon advertised price inclusive of all advertised discounts in place at the original time of order as reflected on my original invoice. The same holds true for the 3 Makita accessories I had ordered with stacked discounts on that same day.

    We shall see if they show up, but they are in UPS’s hands now.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #729124
    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    No retailer is obligated to sell anybody anything if they discover there is a pricing/discounting error.

    If your opinion was anything close to operative law, then that would invite any retailer, at any time, for any reason, to simply claim that any price, even a price made after the fact of entering into a contract for sale, was oops, our bad, a mistake, and thus that retailer would be excused for unilaterally breaching a contract of sale, and cancelling it.

    In such a world, consumers could be induced to enter into a purchase agreements with retailer A (the lying retailer) over retailer B (the truthful retailer), and where time is of the essence in the delivery of goods procured, suffer a substantial loss when the lying retailer A renigs, after the opportunity to buy from retailer B sunsets.

    I don’t know what the laws are in Canada, but that’s not how it works in the United States, nor Australia.

    Since this purchase happened in the US, and both parties to the transaction are also in the US, let’s focus on US Statutes and the policy guidance of the agency authorized by Congress to interpret and enforce them: The Federal Trade Commission.

    But first, a review of the facts and circumstances of this case (and I’ll just use the Makita stapler as a singular example for this illustration).

    TylerTool advertised an “ADDITIONAL 30% OFF” was available for all Makita tools identified as qualifying tools on a specific webpage, for a limited 3 day period of time, and the 30% discount was to be applied to the normal selling prices in the shopping cart if (and only if) the coupon code was entered in the appropriate box on the shopping cart.

    TylerTool advertised this discount publicly, both within and outside of TylerTool’s online properties, by prominently placing conspicuous announcements for the Additional 30% off on it’s home page, as well as prominently placing conspicuous Advertising in both the top line and the right hand box of Google, that appeared when Google users entered “Makita” in the search box.

    TylerTool listed the Makita XST01Z stapler as a qualifying tool on the special webpage of Makita tools for which the additional 30% off coupon code would work.

    TylerTool identified the list price of the tool ($229.99) with a line through that list price, and then prominently displayed their selling price of the tool ($184.31) in red letters, in bolder print, and in larger font, and further stated, also in red letters “You Save 20%”. This advertised discount is without regard to the coupon code that can only be applied at the check out phase.

    The specific details, such as “You Save 20%”, and “Save an Additional 30%”, and the red letters, the bold ink, the larger font, the line through the original list price, the requirement to type in a coupon code… are all very important details when it comes to the law, because these details are material matters of consumer inducement.

    In the administration of Truth in Advertising Laws, the FTC views both the express and the implied claims, and in this case, the evidence is very clear, as all the claims are expressed plainly, down to the percentage of savings that a consumer can expect, which leads (or misleads) a reasonable consumer to buy from one retailer over a competitor.

    Advertising is regulated by both federal and state law. It is unlawful to mislead or deceive in advertising, in details about the product, or the price, including any sales price.

    Back to the specific facts… I put the stapler (advertised at 20% off list) in my cart, and applied the coupon code (advertised at 30% off of all qualifying items in the cart, and the stapler qualified) to the cart, and arrived at a final price of $129.02, which was $100.88 off of list.

    TylerTool accepted my payment, processed the order, generated an Order Number, produced a receipt, and sent me a confirmation email and invoice. Done deal. Or so I thought. A week and a half go by, and no stapler.
    So I called TylerTool, and come to find out they cancelled the order… essentially unilaterally canceling the contract of sale that they and they alone defined all of the terms to at the outset.

    But it gets better, and here is where TylerTool made the biggest error. They very happily offered to generate a new order for me, for the same tool. The final price? <strong class=”d4pbbc-bold”> $249.xx. For the same tool that was $129.02 on the previous order. I didn’t even hear the cents, as what was happening in that moment made no sense, just as Greg said. I might have been incensed, as bait and switch is a violation of the law… but given the insignificant dollar amount involved, I was only amused. I was going to ignore it and let the order go, but Kurt’s suggestion that I call, combined with the principle of the matter, motivated me to follow up.

    Three days, and three TylerTool representatives later (after my initial phone call), I now have a tracking number for this stapler at the originally agreed upon advertised price inclusive of all advertised discounts in place at the original time of order as reflected on my original invoice. The same holds true for the 3 Makita accessories I had ordered with stacked discounts on that same day.

    We shall see if they show up, but they are in UPS’s hands now.

    glad to hear you called and finally got the deal they originally offered.

    #729129
    Doobie
    Moderator

    No retailer is obligated to sell anybody anything if they discover there is a pricing/discounting error.

    If your opinion was anything close to operative law, then that would invite any retailer, at any time, for any reason, to simply claim that any price, even a price made after the fact of entering into a contract for sale, was oops, our bad, a mistake, and thus that retailer would be excused for unilaterally breaching a contract of sale, and cancelling it.

    In such a world, consumers could be induced to enter into a purchase agreements with retailer A (the lying retailer) over retailer B (the truthful retailer), and where time is of the essence in the delivery of goods procured, suffer a substantial loss when the lying retailer A renigs, after the opportunity to buy from retailer B sunsets.

    I don’t know what the laws are in Canada, but that’s not how it works in the United States, nor Australia.

    Ya…..you obviously ‘think’ buying something with a retailer is a contract, which it is not. It is simply an ‘informal agreement’ which unlike contracts are not legally enforceable.

    Yes, there are consumer protection laws in various jurisdictions to protect consumers, but they all have limits as to what a retailer is obligated to do.

    In other words, you can’t force a retailer that advertised or stickered that $1,000 tool for $10 instead because some employee of his needs to go back to school to learn about where to place a decimal, to be obligated to sell it to you.

    Along similar lines, regulatory mandated barcoded pricing adjustments versus stickered/labelled/advertised pricing are also limited in nature to typically top dollar differential limits and also in quantities sold it applies to. There are all sorts of various differences from jurisdiction to another how they enact those kinds of remedies, but nowhere will you still be able to make some serious windfall on those kinds of errors by retailers.

    With a few exceptions, like refusing to sell to someone because of race, sex, or religion types of reasons etc, and good luck proving those reasons, no retailer is obligated to sell anybody anything. What I like about this for me is, if I don’t like somebody, even if they’ve been dealing with me for years, I can fire them as clients at pretty well any time or simply refuse any new business with them. This is pretty standard stuff in most western legal jurisdictions countries of Canada, US, and even those crazy down under folks in the land of Oz.

    All that stuff about Truth in Advertising and what not you mention, we have that kind of stuff here too, but it still doesn’t obligate somebody to sell you something. It just doesn’t. It just means they can get in trouble with whatever authority oversees retailers and or advertisers and their practices, potentially to the extent they get fined or outright banned from continuing to carry on business. It still doesn’t force anybody to sell anything to anybody.

    .

    Regardless, sounds like Tyler Tools possibly did intend to allow discount stacking, contrary to what you originally seemed to describe as that being an error you were jumping on which now appears by what you say now was in fact perfectly fine and intended by TTs, and they were simply sloppy and went and corrected things once you told them of their error in cancelling your orders and of your disappointment. Things got fixed.

    Mistakes happen anywhere, but when it becomes repeated, consider no longer dealing with a firm. That, and maybe reporting them is another recourse. Regulatory bodies get enough similar complaints for the same place, they will act. Other than that, bitchin online is usually our only real recourse. But don’t ever think you can take somebody to court or sue them because they made an error on a retail pricing issue and they won’t sell it to you. You’re wasting your time.

    #729140
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    Makita 18V Cordless Mixer Review – XTU02

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    (and also the World's Fastest Poster)

    #729233
    CB
    Pro

    Ya….. Regardless, sounds like Tyler Tools possibly did intend to allow discount stacking, contrary to what you originally seemed to describe as that being an error you were jumping on which now appears by what you say now was in fact perfectly fine and intended by TTs.

    Huh? Error? Where did I say or even suggest “error”?

    Immediately quoted below is my original post, verbatim:

    Speaking of buying Maktia tools, on online tool retailer has a sale on right now where one can stack two different discounts together, with one of the discounts being 30% off (which by itself is nothing to sneeze at). This 30% off is on top of whatever sale discount (typically between 20-30%) may already apply to the tool without the coupon code.

    The coupon code is MKTWOOD30, and the other discounts which the coupon stacks on top of are on a tool by tool basis.

    The net result was that I saved $250 today, with a total spend of less than $300, including sales tax. Essentially a 50% net discount, as the tools that I applied the 30% off coupon to were already discounted by an average of 25%. It would have been net 60% discount, but the new ruling for sales tax tempered the total savings by about 8.5% All Shipping was free.

    From what I read, the deal expires today, but I don’t know what time. I bought from Tyler Tool, but I think the same deal applies to CPO Outlets.

    Your response might make sense within your fiction, but not in the face of facts.

    But don’t ever think you can take somebody to court or sue them because they made an error on a retail pricing issue and they won’t sell it to you. You’re wasting your time.

    Huh? “Take somebody to court or sue them”? Where did I say I was going to “take somebody to court or sue them”?

    Attorneys are $800 an hour, and this is a $100 tool. Get some perspective.

    Here are the facts:

    Store advertised a sale, and sold items at advertised sale price.
    Seemed like a great deal, so I mentioned it here.
    Store cancelled transaction.
    Seemed like a raw deal, so I mentioned it here.
    Someone here suggested I call store, so I did.
    Store regenerated order, at higher price.
    Seemed like bait advertising, so I mentioned this to the store, and here.
    Store restored original order, at original price.

    Those are the facts. Plain and simple.

    The various fictions you have invented do not apply.

    These laws, however, might have:

    Title 16 → Chapter I → Subchapter B → Part 238 of the Code of Federal Regulations, under the Authorities: Secs. 5, 6, 38 Stat. 719, as amended, 721; 15 U.S.C. 45, 46, as sourced from the legislative intent of Congress per 32 FR 15540, Nov. 8, 1967.

    238.0 Bait advertising defined. (*)

    *For the purpose of this part “advertising” includes any form of public notice however disseminated or utilized.

    Bait advertising is an alluring but insincere offer to sell a product or service which the advertiser in truth does not intend or want to sell. Its purpose is to switch consumers from buying the advertised merchandise, in order to sell something else, usually at a higher price or on a basis more advantageous to the advertiser. The primary aim of a bait advertisement is to obtain leads as to persons interested in buying merchandise of the type so advertised.

    §238.3 Discouragement of purchase of advertised merchandise.

    No act or practice should be engaged in by an advertiser to discourage the purchase of the advertised merchandise as part of a bait scheme to sell other merchandise. Among acts or practices which will be considered in determining if an advertisement is a bona fide offer are:

    (a) The refusal to show, demonstrate, or sell the product offered in accordance with the terms of the offer,

    (b) The disparagement by acts or words of the advertised product or the disparagement of the guarantee, credit terms, availability of service, repairs or parts, or in any other respect, in connection with it,

    (c) The failure to have available at all outlets listed in the advertisement a sufficient quantity of the advertised product to meet reasonably anticipated demands, unless the advertisement clearly and adequately discloses that supply is limited and/or the merchandise is available only at designated outlets,

    (d) The refusal to take orders for the advertised merchandise to be delivered within a reasonable period of time,

    (e) The showing or demonstrating of a product which is defective, unusable or impractical for the purpose represented or implied in the advertisement,

    (f) Use of a sales plan or method of compensation for salesmen or penalizing salesmen, designed to prevent or discourage them from selling the advertised product. [Guide 3]

    §238.4 Switch after sale.

    No practice should be pursued by an advertiser, in the event of sale of the advertised product, of “unselling” with the intent and purpose of selling other merchandise in its stead. Among acts or practices which will be considered in determining if the initial sale was in good faith, and not a strategem to sell other merchandise, are:

    (a) Accepting a deposit for the advertised product, then switching the purchaser to a higher-priced product,

    (b) Failure to make delivery of the advertised product within a reasonable time or to make a refund,

    (c) Disparagement by acts or words of the advertised product, or the disparagement of the guarantee, credit terms, availability of service, repairs, or in any other respect, in connection with it,

    (d) The delivery of the advertised product which is defective, unusable or impractical for the purpose represented or implied in the advertisement. [Guide 4]

    Note: Sales of advertised merchandise. Sales of the advertised merchandise do not preclude the existence of a bait and switch scheme. It has been determined that, on occasions, this is a mere incidental byproduct of the fundamental plan and is intended to provide an aura of legitimacy to the overall operation.

    The Small Business Administration and the Federal Trade Commission are two federal agencies that offer guidance on best practices in advertising, pricing, and selling goods and services to consumers… but Nolo Press also does a great job in breaking down legalese to the layman, and Nolo’s Legal Guide to Starting & Running a Small Business, by Fred S. Steingold, is one such example:

    Deceptive Advertising

    Under both federal and state law, an ad is unlawful if it tends to mislead or deceive, even if it doesn’t actually fool anyone. If your ad is deceptive, you’ll face legal problems whether you intended to mislead the customer or not. What counts is the overall impression created by the ad — not the technical truthfulness of the individual parts.
    FTC Enforcement of Deceptive Advertising Laws

    Over the years, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has taken action against many businesses accused of engaging in false and deceptive advertising. If FTC investigators are convinced that an ad violates the law, they can do all of the following:

    – convince the violator to voluntarily comply with the law

    – issue a cease-and-desist order and bring a civil lawsuit on behalf of people who have been harmed

    – seek a court order (injunction) to stop a questionable ad while an investigation is in progress, and

    – require an advertiser to run corrective ads, admitting that an earlier ad was deceptive.

    Consumers’ Right to Sue for False and Deceptive Advertising

    Consumers often have the right to sue advertisers under state consumer protection laws. For example, someone who buys a product relying on a deceptive ad might sue in small claims court for a refund or join others (sometimes tens of thousands of others) to sue for a huge sum in another court.

    Deceptive Pricing

    The two pricing practices most likely to get your business into trouble are: making incorrect price comparisons with other merchants or with your own “regular” prices, or offering something that is supposedly “free” but in fact has a cost.
    Price Reductions

    Offering a reduction from your usual selling price is a common sales technique. But the reduced price is misleading unless the former price is the actual, bona fide price at which you offered the article. For example, if you announce a new product for $129, but sell it to wholesalers as if it were a $79 product, and similarly discount it to direct customers, the $129 price never really existed — and you have broken the law. It misleads customers into thinking they are receiving a discount.

    It’s even more blatant to buy a special batch of merchandise especially for a sale and create a fictional “regular” price or one you adhered to for only a day or two. Some merchants are tempted to do this when they buy seconds or discontinued product lines at a deep discount and want to pretend customers are getting a bargain.

    If your ad compares your price with what other merchants are charging for the same product, be sure of two things:

    – the other merchants are selling the identical product, and

    – the other merchants had enough sales at the higher price in your area so that you’re offering a legitimate bargain.

    In other words, make sure that the higher comparison price isn’t an isolated or unrepresentative price.
    Less-Than Free Offers

    Regarding offers of “free” products or services, you can offer gifts only if there are no strings attached. For example, if you offer a free paintbrush to anyone who buys a can of paint for $14.95, the brush really isn’t free if you:

    – usually charge less than $14.95 for this kind of paint, or

    – usually provide a service (such as free delivery) with a paint purchase, but don’t when the customer gets a “free” brush.

    Punitive Damages

    Consumer protection laws place a potent weapon in the hands of buyers — punitive damages. In an ordinary lawsuit, a plaintiff can recover only his or her actual losses. But many consumer protection laws allow consumers to ask for additional penalties — which can drastically increase the damage award, sometimes to triple or more of the amount of actual damage. In addition, these laws often require the defendant to pay for the consumer’s attorneys’ fees. The potential for large verdicts gives buyers and their lawyers an incentive to sue if it looks like a law has been violated.

    And directly from the FTC, a few more relevant links on rules that retailers are tasked with abiding by when it comes to advertising:

    https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/advertising-faqs-guide-small-business

    https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/advertising-marketing-internet-rules-road

    Federal Trade Commission (www.ftc.gov), 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20850, 877-FTC-HELP (382-4357)

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #729236
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Ya….. Regardless, sounds like Tyler Tools possibly did intend to allow discount stacking, <strong class=”d4pbbc-bold”>contrary to what you originally seemed to describe as that being an error you were jumping on which now appears by what you say now was in fact perfectly fine and intended by TTs.

    Huh? Error? Where did I say or even suggest “error”?

    Immediately quoted below is my original post, verbatim:

    Speaking of buying Maktia tools, on online tool retailer has a sale on right now where one can stack two different discounts together, with one of the discounts being 30% off (which by itself is nothing to sneeze at). This 30% off is on top of whatever sale discount (typically between 20-30%) may already apply to the tool without the coupon code.

    The coupon code is MKTWOOD30, and the other discounts which the coupon stacks on top of are on a tool by tool basis.

    The net result was that I saved $250 today, with a total spend of less than $300, including sales tax. Essentially a 50% net discount, as the tools that I applied the 30% off coupon to were already discounted by an average of 25%. It would have been net 60% discount, but the new ruling for sales tax tempered the total savings by about 8.5% All Shipping was free.

    From what I read, the deal expires today, but I don’t know what time. I bought from Tyler Tool, but I think the same deal applies to CPO Outlets.

    Your response might make sense within your fiction, but not in the face of facts.

    But don’t ever think you can take somebody to court or sue them because they made an error on a retail pricing issue and they won’t sell it to you. You’re wasting your time.

    Huh? “Take somebody to court or sue them”? Where did I say I was going to “take somebody to court or sue them”?

    Attorneys are $800 an hour, and this is a $100 tool. Get some perspective.

    Here are the facts:

    Store advertised a sale, and sold items at advertised sale price.
    Seemed like a great deal, so I mentioned it here.
    Store cancelled transaction.
    Seemed like a raw deal, so I mentioned it here.
    Someone here suggested I call store, so I did.
    Store regenerated order, at higher price.
    Seemed like bait advertising, so I mentioned this to the store, and here.
    Store restored original order, at original price.

    Those are the facts. Plain and simple.

    The various fictions you have invented do not apply.

    These laws, however, might have:

    Title 16 → Chapter I → Subchapter B → Part 238 of the Code of Federal Regulations, under the Authorities: Secs. 5, 6, 38 Stat. 719, as amended, 721; 15 U.S.C. 45, 46, as sourced from the legislative intent of Congress per 32 FR 15540, Nov. 8, 1967.

    <em class=”d4pbbc-italic”>238.0 Bait advertising defined. (*)
    <em class=”d4pbbc-italic”>
    *For the purpose of this part “advertising” includes any form of public notice however disseminated or utilized.

    Bait advertising is an alluring but insincere offer to sell a product or service which the advertiser in truth does not intend or want to sell. Its purpose is to switch consumers from buying the advertised merchandise, in order to sell something else, usually at a higher price or on a basis more advantageous to the advertiser. The primary aim of a bait advertisement is to obtain leads as to persons interested in buying merchandise of the type so advertised.

    §238.3 Discouragement of purchase of advertised merchandise.

    No act or practice should be engaged in by an advertiser to discourage the purchase of the advertised merchandise as part of a bait scheme to sell other merchandise. Among acts or practices which will be considered in determining if an advertisement is a bona fide offer are:

    (a) The refusal to show, demonstrate, or sell the product offered in accordance with the terms of the offer,

    (b) The disparagement by acts or words of the advertised product or the disparagement of the guarantee, credit terms, availability of service, repairs or parts, or in any other respect, in connection with it,

    (c) The failure to have available at all outlets listed in the advertisement a sufficient quantity of the advertised product to meet reasonably anticipated demands, unless the advertisement clearly and adequately discloses that supply is limited and/or the merchandise is available only at designated outlets,

    (d) The refusal to take orders for the advertised merchandise to be delivered within a reasonable period of time,

    (e) The showing or demonstrating of a product which is defective, unusable or impractical for the purpose represented or implied in the advertisement,

    (f) Use of a sales plan or method of compensation for salesmen or penalizing salesmen, designed to prevent or discourage them from selling the advertised product. [Guide 3]

    §238.4 Switch after sale.

    No practice should be pursued by an advertiser, in the event of sale of the advertised product, of “unselling” with the intent and purpose of selling other merchandise in its stead. Among acts or practices which will be considered in determining if the initial sale was in good faith, and not a strategem to sell other merchandise, are:

    (a) Accepting a deposit for the advertised product, then switching the purchaser to a higher-priced product,

    (b) Failure to make delivery of the advertised product within a reasonable time or to make a refund,

    (c) Disparagement by acts or words of the advertised product, or the disparagement of the guarantee, credit terms, availability of service, repairs, or in any other respect, in connection with it,

    (d) The delivery of the advertised product which is defective, unusable or impractical for the purpose represented or implied in the advertisement. [Guide 4]

    <em class=”d4pbbc-italic”>Note: Sales of advertised merchandise. Sales of the advertised merchandise do not preclude the existence of a bait and switch scheme. It has been determined that, on occasions, this is a mere incidental byproduct of the fundamental plan and is intended to provide an aura of legitimacy to the overall operation.

    The Small Business Administration and the Federal Trade Commission are two federal agencies that offer guidance on best practices in advertising, pricing, and selling goods and services to consumers… but Nolo Press also does a great job in breaking down legalese to the layman, and Nolo’s Legal Guide to Starting & Running a Small Business, by Fred S. Steingold, is one such example:

    <em class=”d4pbbc-italic”>Deceptive Advertising
    <em class=”d4pbbc-italic”>
    Under both federal and state law, an ad is unlawful if it tends to mislead or deceive, even if it doesn’t actually fool anyone. If your ad is deceptive, you’ll face legal problems whether you intended to mislead the customer or not. What counts is the overall impression created by the ad — not the technical truthfulness of the individual parts.
    FTC Enforcement of Deceptive Advertising Laws

    Over the years, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has taken action against many businesses accused of engaging in false and deceptive advertising. If FTC investigators are convinced that an ad violates the law, they can do all of the following:

    – convince the violator to voluntarily comply with the law

    – issue a cease-and-desist order and bring a civil lawsuit on behalf of people who have been harmed

    – seek a court order (injunction) to stop a questionable ad while an investigation is in progress, and

    – require an advertiser to run corrective ads, admitting that an earlier ad was deceptive.

    Consumers’ Right to Sue for False and Deceptive Advertising

    Consumers often have the right to sue advertisers under state consumer protection laws. For example, someone who buys a product relying on a deceptive ad might sue in small claims court for a refund or join others (sometimes tens of thousands of others) to sue for a huge sum in another court.

    Deceptive Pricing

    The two pricing practices most likely to get your business into trouble are: making incorrect price comparisons with other merchants or with your own “regular” prices, or offering something that is supposedly “free” but in fact has a cost.
    Price Reductions

    Offering a reduction from your usual selling price is a common sales technique. But the reduced price is misleading unless the former price is the actual, bona fide price at which you offered the article. For example, if you announce a new product for $129, but sell it to wholesalers as if it were a $79 product, and similarly discount it to direct customers, the $129 price never really existed — and you have broken the law. It misleads customers into thinking they are receiving a discount.

    It’s even more blatant to buy a special batch of merchandise especially for a sale and create a fictional “regular” price or one you adhered to for only a day or two. Some merchants are tempted to do this when they buy seconds or discontinued product lines at a deep discount and want to pretend customers are getting a bargain.

    If your ad compares your price with what other merchants are charging for the same product, be sure of two things:

    – the other merchants are selling the identical product, and

    – the other merchants had enough sales at the higher price in your area so that you’re offering a legitimate bargain.

    In other words, make sure that the higher comparison price isn’t an isolated or unrepresentative price.
    Less-Than Free Offers

    Regarding offers of “free” products or services, you can offer gifts only if there are no strings attached. For example, if you offer a free paintbrush to anyone who buys a can of paint for $14.95, the brush really isn’t free if you:

    – usually charge less than $14.95 for this kind of paint, or

    – usually provide a service (such as free delivery) with a paint purchase, but don’t when the customer gets a “free” brush.

    Punitive Damages

    <em class=”d4pbbc-italic”>Consumer protection laws place a potent weapon in the hands of buyers — punitive damages. In an ordinary lawsuit, a plaintiff can recover only his or her actual losses. But many consumer protection laws allow consumers to ask for additional penalties — which can drastically increase the damage award, sometimes to triple or more of the amount of actual damage. In addition, these laws often require the defendant to pay for the consumer’s attorneys’ fees. The potential for large verdicts gives buyers and their lawyers an incentive to sue if it looks like a law has been violated.

    And directly from the FTC, a few more relevant links on rules that retailers are tasked with abiding by when it comes to advertising:

    https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/advertising-faqs-guide-small-business

    https://www.ftc.gov/tips-advice/business-center/guidance/advertising-marketing-internet-rules-road

    Federal Trade Commission (www.ftc.gov), 600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20850, 877-FTC-HELP (382-4357)

    Whatever.

    #729237
    Doobie
    Moderator

    I’m interested in buying thepower sweep accesory for my dual 18V power shaft and today there was a town hired contractor in front of my house doing an old tree stump removal ground restoration with the gas powered Stihl power shaft using a sweep attachment, so I went oit and asked him if I could try it.

    He let me use it for a bit in both towards and brush away modes. I wanted to get a better idea how well it worked and get his opinion. He said using it on grass, the blades last a long time, but on pavement they wear away much quicker which makes sense.

    #729275
    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC
    #729463
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Makita Cordless Rebar Cutter Cuts Rebar Faster and Safer Than Grinders

    https://www.protoolreviews.com/tools/power/corded/specialty/makita-cordless-rebar-cutter-kit-xcs04t1/48300/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=breaking_into_advanced_battery_design_plus_the_latest_news_and_reviews_for_pros&utm_term=2019-08-12

    But man is it pricey. They also make a cordless rebar tieing machine if I’m not mistaken.

    Bosch should be offering these kinds of tools also being so big into concrete related stuff.

    #729551
    CB
    Pro

    glad to hear you called and finally got the deal they originally offered.

    Thanks Kurt. And thank you for the suggestion to call. I was just going to let it go otherwise.

    As a final update, all the items, billed at the originally advertised stacked discount price, arrived via UPS today. TylerTool / CPO Tools did finally deliver on the terms of the original orders, despite inexplicably canceling those orders previously.

    Printing and taking screen shots of the initial orders when originally placed was helpful on my end when talking with the three different people who passed the hot potato. I made the printouts to help remind me of what I had coming in the mail, and as receipts for account reconciliation.

    But the contemporaneous records proved helpful in providing an ability to both cite with specificity and prove with evidence the exact price per item on the initial orders, and while it turned out that the vendor ultimately had that information in their computer all along, the initial layers of personnel I spoke with all claimed ignorance, but couldn’t deny the records I was able to produce.

    Therefore, it is a good idea to always print or screenshot any online order at the time the order is placed, which motivate the people on the other lend of the line to go to bat and get authorization to execute the pricing overrides necessary to match the pricing previously represented.

    BE the change you want to see.
    Even if you can't Be The Pro... Be the Poster you'd want to read.

    #729564
    Doobie
    Moderator

    Therefore, it is a good idea to always print or screenshot any online order at the time the order is placed,…..

    Highly recommend that when dealing with places that there is not already a strong established history of past purchases or being a newbie in buying with them. I’m remiss on occasion doing such to my chagrin in getting things rectified properly with greater ease otherwise in doing so.

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