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#2 TEAL TIME,,Lastest MAKITA TOOLS

This topic contains 722 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  GTokley 1 day, 9 hours ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 41 through 60 (of 723 total)
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  • #707095

    Doobie
    Pro

    I can’t stand the (typically American) youtubers who have the camera pointed at their face and up their nose all the time. I just don’t get it. Why do they think their viewership needs or wants to look at them?

    People with big egos. We’re in the age of ‘It’s all about me’.

    #707136

    CB
    Pro

    In consideration of the Makita track saw… as an alternative way to obtain a rapid charger and batteries at a better value, combined with a tool that doesn’t replicate what I have… I looked at video last night of how to make a track for a worm drive Bosch saw out of rectangular aluminum tubing.

    Nevermind that the cost for aluminum stock could very well exceed the cost of a Makita track already machined… the video itself was still quite interesting, and I believe it was Russian. And that is what I like about videos from Scandinavians and Russians. They don’t say one frickin word. They know their language will not be broadly understood in the US market where they want their videos to accumulate views, so they don’t bother talking.

    And because they are not talking, they keep the camera pointed at the work, and tell the entire story visually, with far more clarity and focus, then the talking heads in the USA manage to do.

    #707141

    CB
    Pro

    I didn’t know that. You mean any of the Makita tools can be ordered in the different colors?

    I don’t know about “any” of the Makita tools, but the photo certainly suggests that in Japan at least, their TD171D (suspected to be equivalent to the European/Australian DTD171 and the forthcoming North American XDT16) is available in the colors shown.

    It would be kind of cool if ANY Makita tool in EVERY market was available in ALL colors, but I’d rather Makita maintain a lower cost of manufacturing, and funnel those costs into functional content, rather than varietal color.

    At the end of the 80’s the guys gave me a fair amount of ribbing about my Model 77 worm drive Skilsaw that is a solid GOLD color with black handles, rather than the common gray body color with gray handles of the ’70’s and ’80’s, or the common gray body with red handles of the magnesium line that began in the early ’90’s and carried over into the ’00’s. My old gold saw is heavy as hell, but I’ve had it for over 30 years, and the reason Skilsaw painted it gold is because it just so happened to be SkilSaw’s 50th Anniversary of their game changing worm drive invention…. which I guess was now over 80 years ago.

    Anyway, I was working on a house, and the neighbor gave me a SkilSaw sidewinder “Classic” edition, complete with the blow molded case. I don’t use right blade sidewinders unless I have to run a bevel face down approaching from the left, so I never considered the quality of Skilsaw’s “Classic” edition… because I was too enamored with the color. It too, was GOLD!

    How could I go wrong? Let the guys tease me now that I’m sporting two matching gold SkilSaws, my 50th anniversary sturdy and stalwart Model 77, and this gold “Classic”. Which I later had to rename “Crappic”. What an awful saw. No wonder the neighbor gave it away. Moral of the story… give me quality over color any day.

    #707144

    CB
    Pro

    @cb. I’m thinking an even simpler solution to control blade depth to avoid knicking romex and such is simply to somehow fasten an additional homemade base plate to the bottom of the tool and still use the OEM Makita blades for it.

    If still using the OEM Makita blades, what need would there be to “simply” “somehow” fasten an additional homemade base plate to the bottom of the tool? The OEM drywall blade was already engineered to work optimally with the tool’s existing baseplate, which already has a non marring plastic snap on cover that is difficult enough to remove without snapping off the rear tab.

    Whenever the word “simply” is combined with the word “somehow”, one of the two is probably not true.

    #707403

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    @cb. I’m thinking an even simpler solution to control blade depth to avoid knicking romex and such is simply to somehow fasten an additional homemade base plate to the bottom of the tool and still use the OEM Makita blades for it.

    If still using the OEM Makita blades, what need would there be to “simply” “somehow” fasten an additional homemade base plate to the bottom of the tool? The OEM drywall blade was already engineered to work optimally with the tool’s existing baseplate, which already has a non marring plastic snap on cover that is difficult enough to remove without snapping off the rear tab.

    Whenever the word “simply” is combined with the word “somehow”, one of the two is probably not true.

    the romax is on top of thr bottom cords of the trussrs snd in the middle of the joist.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #707448

    CB
    Pro

    the romax is on top of thr bottom cords of the trussrs snd in the middle of the joist.

    A suggested edit might be:

    The Romex is supposed to be run over the top edges of the bottom chords of the trusses, and where run parallel to trusses, stapled to the middle of the ceiling joist/chord.

    But in reality, I more often cut into walls, not ceilings, so the above wouldn’t apply. And I’ve cut out enough wallboard to expose stud bays and found where a part of the Romex was “leaning” against the inside surface of the drywall, and I was fortunate enough to miss it because I restricted the depth of cut to the thickness of the drywall.

    #707451

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    I guess one of the benefits of me running into crazy hard and thick plaster walls is these same era construction also tend to use rigid or EMT conduits for electrical so I seldom had to worry about cutting into wires. If I do see a nmb cable it means a reno.

    #707452

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Yes you are right about the restricted depth concept. I do it also when ever cutting into a wall.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #707463

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    Yes you are right about the restricted depth concept. I do it also when ever cutting into a wall.

    I wonder when they put a hard cast around people’s arms and legs, how does the doctor remove the cast at the end without cutting too deep? Do they use a saw?

    #707479

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Yes you are right about the restricted depth concept. I do it also when ever cutting into a wall.

    I wonder when they put a hard cast around people’s arms and legs, how does the doctor remove the cast at the end without cutting too deep? Do they use a saw?

    It’s almost like a omt tool. It will cut the cast. But not your arm , I guess it’s because of the flexibility in the skin and muscle. Years ago it did leave small very small surface scraping. But no cutting.

    #707488

    CB
    Pro

    I finally broke down and ordered a pair of genuine Makita batteries today (BL1860b-2 6.0 ah, why mess around?) and, separately, the Makita dual port rapid optimized charger. It will be another week before these items get in, so I have yet to be able to turn on switch and see if this drywall cutter even works.

    The Makita battery jungle is a thicket of thieves. It isn’t the obvious third party batteries…. it is the more insidiously labeled batteries that say Makita on them, and are even packaged in Makita labeled packaging.

    I noticed that the Makita packaging on eBay didn’t have the teal color on the bottom that the Makita packaging on Amazon had. I watched a youtube video of two Makita labeled batteries of equal amp hour ratings disassembled, and one could see the circuit board differences, the cell connection plate differences, and the wiring differences in the video.

    I tried to buy all of this stuff at my local lumber yards, but none of my local yards (four of them) carried the drywall tool, nor the 6.0 ah batteries. One had the dual port rapid charger, but since I was already forced to shop online (not my preference), it didn’t make any sense to pay twice as much to shop local, when local didn’t have the bulk of what I wanted.

    I didn’t need 6.0ah batteries for the drywall tool. I simply wanted them, because the 6.0ah batteries are no heavier nor larger than the 3.0 ah batteries, and yet the 2x greater capacity will be useful for the next teal tool I might be most likely to buy, now that I’m on board with their LXT line up.

    The drywall saw was Made In Japan, btw.

    #707508

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    @cb I would be very interested in the Makita drywall tool. We have discussed finding tools to use for cutting extra thick hard plaster in another thread, and I am always in search of something that may work better than what I have now especially in terms of dust collection.

    After seeing your post about this drywall saw, I started to look at that closely and looked at a bunch of reviews and videos. I must say I am very intrigued.

    From what I have read so far this is what I got out of it:

    (1) The special blade is very expensive.
    (2) There is question whether that blade can cut hard plaster, or if it can, whether that expensive blade will dull quickly.
    (3) Many people seem to compare it to a jigsaw, it doesn’t appear to work like a jigsaw up down motion, it’s orbtal. The saw blade teeth at the tip for plunge cuts.
    (4) Saw a bunch of complaints about the lack of a dedicated hard case for it, mostly because of the blade sticking out the bottom is easy to bend if you don’t sit it down just right. The blade is not as easy to remove to I guess most just leave it on the saw.
    (5) A few guys stressed that it’s important to handle the saw gently after use. The transparent shield and the protruding blades are weak spots, if not careful these break easy.
    (6) A lot of positive feedback on the handling and how “dust free” it is. I know for a grinder with a shroud, when the cut is deep, there is dust thrown into the groove that is not extracted into the DC. Also if you are cutting something like a new cement board on a table, the dust on the bottom side as it cuts through cannot be avoided, this saw seems to do better with collecting the dust on the underside perhaps due to the orbital motion.

    Again, very curious about your thoughts on this saw when you get around to try it.

    #707513

    CB
    Pro

    Thank you Miamicuse, for such a nice, substantive post summarizing your research and reviews of others who have used this tool. Separate and apart from the subject of the tool itself, it is certainly enjoyable to read instructive and insightful commentary that contributes content that is useful.

    Now on to the issues:

    (4) Makita does include a blade guard, that ships in a stored position in a quasi holster on the side of the tool, above the foot plate. I haven’t installed the blade yet (no point, until the batteries arrive and are charged), but when I do, I will de-holster the blade guard and mount it over the installed blade.

    (3) The form factor of the tool approximates a jig saw, and many jig saws are orbital, including my Bosch jig saw. But the difference between a jig saw and this saw is that this saw’s actuating arm motion move appears to be anchored horizontally toward the aft end of the blade, rather than vertically, toward the top end of the blade. In that sense, I guess it would more approximate a reciprocating saw’s in and out motion, but it isn’t quite that either.

    I think that is the innovation that makes this saw unique enough for me to acquire yet another new battery system just in order to run it. I think it was “Cedarboarder” on CT that said that “tears of joy” were streaming down his face when he used it… no doubt hyperbole said for dramatic effect, but any words fail when it comes to finally finding a way to easily overcome the pain in the butt factor of certain jobs, and I consider rooster tails of drywall spinning in my face, and all over the job area that I will later have to take time to clean up… a pain. I’ll take those tears of joy thank you.

    (5) Thank you for the heads up on the delicate nature of the transparent plastic shield. I’ve already removed and replaced it again, and agree that it requires care in handling.

    (6) I would not waste this tool on table top cutting of any material, including drywall, unless pocket cutting an electrical box on a new sheet. I bought this tool to solve the problems of cleanly cutting pre installed existing drywall, in cases where the job is NOT a demo, but rather a minimally invasive surgical incision in a part of any occupied residence that is not involved with the remodel, but needs to be accessed for electrical, plumbing, or termite infestation / mold / dryrot investigation.

    (2) Last but not least… I’ve found other fully shrouded, vacuum port enhanced tools that I think would serve your 1.5″ plaster / lath / metal challenges more effectively than this drywall cutter. As you saw, I posted a couple of teal examples in the other thread, but there are 4 or 5 more options in just the Makita line alone, corded and cordless. And that doesn’t begin to scratch the surface of other tool company offerings. I’m watching that thread, but haven’t been actively shopping for tools anymore since you posted. But whenever I run across more viable options, I’ll post them on your thread.

    #707669

    Doobie
    Pro

    Finally, something in english with what is coming out from Makita in 2019.

    That new impact is indeed nice.

    #707670

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Finally, something in english with what is coming out from Makita in 2019.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe width=”770″ height=”433″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/OWBsHhjqFIM?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=””></iframe></figure>
    That new impact is indeed nice.

    Makita definitely seems to listen to what contractors are saying. That metal circular saw is great that they increased the blade. The heads of the impact looks so tiny compared to other manufacturers.
    Good video Kevin

    #707710

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Finally, something in english with what is coming out from Makita in 2019.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/OWBsHhjqFIM?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=”” width=”770″ height=”433″ frameborder=”0″></iframe></figure>
    That new impact is indeed nice.

    So many gimicks in one tool.. My friends that are very good at using a impact would laugh.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #707720

    Doobie
    Pro

    So many gimicks in one tool.. My friends that are very good at using a impact would laugh.

    That’s not surprising. Takes years for some to accept change. Reminds me of how everybody mocked lights on them years ago. Now people complain if there is just one and not a ring of them to see better.

    #707734

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    Finally, something in english with what is coming out from Makita in 2019.

    <figure class=”oe-video-container”><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/OWBsHhjqFIM?feature=oembed&wmode=opaque” allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture” allowfullscreen=”” width=”770″ height=”433″ frameborder=”0″></iframe></figure>
    That new impact is indeed nice.

    So many gimicks in one tool.. My friends that are very good at using a impact would laugh.

    At times , I actually prefer to use a drill for some screws , I find you can actually feel that difference. When using an impact sometime it’s hard to feel the torque like the drill 🤔 but maybe I’m just old school lol

    #707747

    CB
    Pro

    The long bit looked like it was wobbling to me.

    If they want to emphasize the idea that the dual ball bearings in the new XDT16Z prevent precession at the tip bit which increases likelihood of cam out, then they need to put the XDT16 along side the XDT12 that it is replacing, in order to demonstrate the difference in tip wobble.

    Or better yet, put it up against the Milwaukee 2853/2857, with each having the same brand and length click in tip, to eliminate variance in shank groove machining.

    Without a tightenable 3 jaw chuck, whether keyless or keyed, I don’t see how tip wobble can be avoided with a click in bit.

    #707748

    Sorpa
    Pro
    Pierrefonds, Qc

    The long bit looked like it was wobbling to me.

    If they want to emphasize the idea that the dual ball bearings in the new XDT16Z prevent precession at the tip bit which increases likelihood of cam out, then they need to put the XDT16 along side the XDT12 that it is replacing, in order to demonstrate the difference in tip wobble.

    Or better yet, put it up against the Milwaukee 2853/2857, with each having the same brand and length click in tip, to eliminate variance in shank groove machining.

    Without a tightenable 3 jaw chuck, whether keyless or keyed, I don’t see how tip wobble can be avoided with a click in bit.

    Yep, wobbling and squiggling like a fish in a hook.
    Bunch of wannabes.
    I have yet to see somebody in trades squeezing the trigger of an impact drill with their digitus tertius aka middle finger aka bad finger. OK the last one is translated from french : mauvais doigt.

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