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#2 TEAL TIME,,Lastest MAKITA TOOLS

This topic contains 506 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  Doobie 1 day, 6 hours ago.

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  • #706806

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Too much more technology for me to understand, but apparently the tool is already available in Japan, sold as the TD171, to rave reviews for the improvements.

    Had the wifey look it up on the Japanese tool site and it cost 23,200 yen = 205$ for the tool only.
    Here’s the linky, it has a video in it.

    https://www.makita.co.jp/product/category/ana_ake/td171d/td171d.html

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #706817

    CB
    Pro

    I guess I need to brush up on my Japanese, since I couldn’t find where the video was in that link, but thank you for posting it all the same, as I did learn a few more things about the tool, and about Makita in general.

    For example, did you know that you could order Makita tools in a choice of 5 different colors? That would be a neat way to distinguish your tools from the next guy’s on a busy job. I think I’d pick the brown color on the end. Then I wouldn’t have to worry about cleaning them.

    #706837

    CB
    Pro

    Back to the Makita drywall cutter…

    If you have this tool, have you destroyed the $20 blades on screws/nails in the drywall, especially when splitting the stud line?

    #706840

    Doobie
    Pro

    Back to the Makita drywall cutter…

    If you have this tool, have you destroyed the $20 blades on screws/nails in the drywall, especially when splitting the stud line?

    Haven’t used mine yet, but I will be sometime in January. I bought an extra set of blades just in case of that.

    My question is whether it can cut thru Hardie fiber cement siding without dulling the blades super fast. One of the things I was hoping to use it for this summer to install an electrical box on the outside of my shed shed clad in Hardie.

    #706861

    Boschmanbrian
    Pro
    Montreal , QC, Canada

    I guess I need to brush up on my Japanese, since I couldn’t find where the video was in that link, but thank you for posting it all the same, as I did learn a few more things about the tool, and about Makita in general.

    For example, did you know that you could order Makita tools in a choice of 5 different colors? That would be a neat way to distinguish your tools from the next guy’s on a busy job. I think I’d pick the brown color on the end. Then I wouldn’t have to worry about cleaning them.

    I didn’t know that. You mean any of the Makita tools can be ordered in the different colors?

    #706863

    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    If you have this tool, have you destroyed the $20 blades on screws/nails in the drywall, especially when splitting the stud line?

    now that sucks when the blade can’t handle that. you only hit one nail and it destroyed the blade?

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    #706873

    CB
    Pro

    If you have this tool, have you destroyed the $20 blades on screws/nails in the drywall, especially when splitting the stud line?

    now that sucks when the blade can’t handle that. you only hit one nail and it destroyed the blade?

    Not me, I haven’t received the saw yet. Instead, I received a surprise refund from Amazon. I learned this when my credit card company notified me of the refund. I called Amazon to ask why, and as it turns out, the delivery driver reported that item was missing from his van when he returned back to wherever the Amazon mothership is.

    It was TRThomas, on CT, who posted:

    I have that saw, it is awesome on sheetrock. Opening up sheetrock with a knife is probably my least favorite thing to do, but with the saw it is effortless and with a vacuum hooked up completely dustless. This is the only tool I own that could ever persuade me to buy that Makita backpack vac. With Milwaukees latest offering, however I would probably go team red.

    Also, I wouldn’t waste your money on the Makita gypsum blades for cutting rock. You can us 2 or 3 sections of 3/4″ snap off utility blades, and they work just about the same as the $13/each Makita blades. I wrecked the blade that comes with the saw on the first cut I made hitting a screw head, folded 3 or 4 teeth completely backwards.

    Any 3/4″ snap blades. Tajima makes the best ones I have used. I tried some cheap “serrated” snap blades I bought from Amazon but they shattered on me when I tried to clamp them in the chuck. I really don’t understand how makita justifies the cost of those blades. I can buy a 12″ long carbide tooth (with.. 40? carbide teeth) Diablo demo blade for $20, or a 2″ piece of stamped steel for $7 less.”

    So, if I order the tool again, I’ll have to think about blades. I’m having a hard time visualizing how the saw will be as effective pocket cutting preinstalled drywall using straight razor blades without benefit of serrations, but apparently it works for TRThomas.

    One difference between this drywall cut out saw versus the little 3+” Makita circular saw (from the 9.6v system) that I’ve been using for more than a quarter of a century is that with the mini circular saw, I can visually see the blade (a serrated plywood blade, very thin) directly contact the drywall where it is actually cutting.

    With this new fangled drywall cut out saw, the foot plate of the jig saw like construction entirely blocks a direct view of the blade’s contact with the cut line and material. I’m not sure that I will like that. I think, had I considered this point more carefully, I might not have ordered the saw.

    In fact, once Amazon cancelled my order, I decided not to reorder it. But then Amazon customer service called me, and the lady was so nice, she bent over backwards to expedite a replacement to make it right, and I just couldn’t turn down her earnest efforts. So the dam thing is in the mail again. We shall see if the next driver “loses” it also.

    .

    #706891

    Doobie
    Pro

    Do you have a link for those alternate Tajima blades by chance @cb? I’d be interested in looking at those possibly should I encounter the same issue the fellow on CT encountered.

    #706911

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Do you have a link for those alternate Tajima blades by chance @cb? I’d be interested in looking at those possibly should I encounter the same issue the fellow on CT encountered.

    Here’s the Tajima blade….

    Attachments:

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #706924

    CB
    Pro

    Do you have a link for those alternate Tajima blades by chance @cb? I’d be interested in looking at those possibly should I encounter the same issue the fellow on CT encountered.

    No specific link. But there is no shortage of links resulting from entering “Tajima blades” in any search engine, and you’ll probably want to select your own Canada centric supply source.

    The comments regarding using Tajima snap blades in the XDS01 are quoted from TRThomas. Might be best for you to ask him which specific model Tajima blade he has success with, as there are several models of blades with differing hardnesses, costs, and intended applications.

    My assessment, limited to only looking at online photos of the 18mm wide Tajima blades (nominally 3/4″ as TRThomas mentioned) is as follows:

    1. There is only one circular locating hole in the Tajima snap off blades, whereas the Makita serrated blades designed for the tool are slotted. The long slot is how depth of cut is controlled, relative to the baseplate.

    A controlled depth of cut is critical to blind cutting inside walls, to avoid nicking romex that may be “leaning” up against the inside surface of the drywall, due to scrimping the staple schedule, a pop out from the line pull, heat jacking of the cable from thermal cycling, a previous tenant or homeowner or remodeling contractor tugging on the cable from the box further up or down the stud bay… an unlimited variety of reasons why the romex could be bowed against the back side of that drywall.

    2. The segmentation of the Tajima blades are typically divided into seven snap off sections of 10mm increments each.

    This 10mm segmentation is almost but not quite two times the stroke of the saw, which has only a 1/4″ stroke. If the blade can only be pinned to the saw in one place, due having a circular hole instead of a slotted one, and if the blade can only be snapped in 10 mm increments, which is almost double the length of the stroke, then the blade is likely to end up either too long, or too short.

    This observation puts into perspective what TRThomas mentioned in passing, that he uses “2 or 3 sections of 3/4″ snap off utility blades”. Either 2, or 3 sections. And there is a 10mm difference in between these sections. Yet there is little more than a 3mm difference between 5/8″ and 1/2″ sheetrock.

    3. Tajima also makes solid blades, without segmentation. Cutting premium grade hardened steel conditioned with “Japanese Style” tempering and a “multistep” sharpening process… without mangling the whole point of the blade, which is it’s sharpness and resistance to deformation at the edge… just in order to get the right cutting depth based on the stroke length of the saw and the depth of the material…seems to defeat the “whole point” of getting a Tajima blade in the first place. Besides, that’s not what TRThomas suggested. He suggests snap off blades, not solid blades.

    4. The single, circular mounting hole in Tajima’s 18mm (3/4″ nominal) snap off blades is off center relative to the longitudinal axis of the blade, biased toward the cutting edge. (See Tajima blade image under 2, above)

    The elongated mounting slot in Makita’s drywall blade is also somewhat off center relative to the longitudinal axis of the blade, but is biased toward the opposite end of the principle cutting edge, where the “principle” edge is presumed to be the edge that has the leading radius, to ease plunging into the material.

    Therefore, not only is the utility knife lacking a leading radius to ease the start of stroke into the material on the plunge cut… the off set bias of the Tajima blade’s mounting hole is opposite of the intended primary pushing direction of the tool.

    Granted, the tool can be pushed or pulled in either direction, but the 45 degree angled handle tends to ergonomically dictate a primary cutting direction, with the opposite direction being secondary… useful to complete corners or overcome access challenges, but not as comfortable to do the long straight runs. The primary cutting direction is confirmed by the V notch (for cutting line alignment) in the base plate. There isn’t a V notch on either end of the baseplate. Just one end, in the primary cutting direction, where the radiused corner of the factory blade is.

    I don’t have the tool, so I cannot speak to how a utility blade with an off set mounting hole bias can be mounted to the blade holder designed for blades that also have a slight offset mounting bias, but in the opposing direction. This is something that I might take a look at when or if the tool ever arrives, but I initially intend to keep it simple and just stick with the blade that Makita designed for the tool.

    5. I saved the most obvious for last. The Tajima blade doesn’t have any teeth. That means, I assume, that the cut is relying on friction and hand pressure to move forward along the cut. The Makita blade has long serrations, or teeth, that add a host of extra edges that are oriented more perpendicularly to the motion of the stroke. So the motor in the machine itself is able to assist in the tearing through of the material, because the angled (but nearly horizontal) edges of the teeth are able to tear into the material on the up and down directions of the stroke.

    I can’t visualize how a smooth straight blade, with only a single point, can accomplish as much tearing action per stroke. The Makita blade has an archipelago of sharp points all tearing, and more importantly, also clearing the kerf at once. It seems to me that single smooth blade edge rubbing back and forth would generate a lot of heat, but not an efficient cut.

    The above all being said, no amount of educated conjecture beats using the tool in reality. That’s why I asked, “if you have this saw, have you destroyed the factory blades?” I’m still asking, until Amazon can manage to actually deliver the tool itself.

    #706928

    Doobie
    Pro

    @cb. I’m thinking an even simpler solution to control blade depth to avoid knicking romex and such is simply to somehow fasten an additional homemade base plate to the bottom of the tool and still use the OEM Makita blades for it.

    Or, maybe one of those slot cutters for J channel aluminum trim could be used to elongate the hole in a snap off blade although I think it may be too thick for such a hand held tool.

    #706931

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Or, maybe one of those slot cutters for J channel aluminum trim could be used to elongate the hole in a snap off blade although I think it may be too thick for such a hand held tool.

    The snap blades are very hard and the slot cutter for siding will not go through it.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #706943

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    My question is whether it can cut thru Hardie fiber cement siding without dulling the blades super fast. One of the things I was hoping to use it for this summer to install an electrical box on the outside of my shed shed clad in Hardie.

    I doubt it could cut Hardie boards. I have seen videos where it can cut wood with a wood blade. Not sure what is the maximum depth though.

    The idea is nice, a plunge cut tool with good control and visibility and dust collection. Exactly what I have been looking for to cut existing rock lath over an inch thick with embedded metal lath. So far all I can find that can possibly do it is a grinder with a cutting shroud fitted for DC. Even in that case the depth is limited to less than an inch, and the shroud won’t help on inside corners. If this tool can do hardi boards, there may be a slim chance it can do rock lath and I would be very interested.

    As for your electrical box, do you have to do it recessed? If you surface mount the box there is no need to cut the board, just a drilled hole would work.

    #706955

    Doobie
    Pro

    As for your electrical box, do you have to do it recessed?

    I would prefer recessed. Surface mounts only come in grey or if in white, I can’t find one that has an in use cover and get a white 20A recepticle. Just haven’t found the actual component combo for either that does what I’m looking for in use and looks good. Now that winter is really here, this is deferred now til next spring at the earliest anyways.

    #706969

    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    Not me, I haven’t received the saw yet. Instead, I received a surprise refund from Amazon. I learned this when my credit card company notified me of the refund. I called Amazon to ask why, and as it turns out, the delivery driver reported that item was missing from his van when he returned back to wherever the Amazon mothership is.

    Now that sucks.
    in your previous post I thought that you damaged the blade when hitting nails 😛
    maybe I just interpreted it wrong haha

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    #706970

    Doobie
    Pro

    Not me, I haven’t received the saw yet. Instead, I received a surprise refund from Amazon. I learned this when my credit card company notified me of the refund. I called Amazon to ask why, and as it turns out, the delivery driver reported that item was missing from his van when he returned back to wherever the Amazon mothership is.

    Now that sucks.
    in your previous post I thought that you damaged the blade when hitting nails 😛
    maybe I just interpreted it wrong haha

    IIRC CB was just stating what another user on CT he read had experienced for which he had concerns about it hitting nails and what alternatives were amenable to undertake.

    #707050

    Miamicuse
    Pro
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida

    As for your electrical box, do you have to do it recessed?

    I would prefer recessed. Surface mounts only come in grey or if in white, I can’t find one that has an in use cover and get a white 20A recepticle. Just haven’t found the actual component combo for either that does what I’m looking for in use and looks good. Now that winter is really here, this is deferred now til next spring at the earliest anyways.

    Not familiar with Canadian electrical, but in the USA we typically buy the box independent of the cover. The box can be metal or plastic, one gang or two gangs usually, and in bronze, white or gray colors. Then there are dozens of in use covers with various features and configurations. I typically do these boxes surface mounted, as the in use cover tend to stick out a few inches anyways to allow the room needed for a plug and some cord. Some of the in use covers expands and collapses, but I didn’t like those as they didn’t perform as good as the hard covers in heavy driving rain.

    #707061

    Doobie
    Pro

    As for your electrical box, do you have to do it recessed?

    I would prefer recessed. Surface mounts only come in grey or if in white, I can’t find one that has an in use cover and get a white 20A recepticle. Just haven’t found the actual component combo for either that does what I’m looking for in use and looks good. Now that winter is really here, this is deferred now til next spring at the earliest anyways.

    Not familiar with Canadian electrical, but in the USA we typically buy the box independent of the cover. The box can be metal or plastic, one gang or two gangs usually, and in bronze, white or gray colors. Then there are dozens of in use covers with various features and configurations. I typically do these boxes surface mounted, as the in use cover tend to stick out a few inches anyways to allow the room needed for a plug and some cord. Some of the in use covers expands and collapses, but I didn’t like those as they didn’t perform as good as the hard covers in heavy driving rain.

    I’m likely gonna custom build what I really want. Basically will be some kind of semi flush install of a double gang box in a white or almond with a decent in use cover with 20A plugs. If I have to, in order to make it work out esthetically, I’ll go single gang if necessary.

    I didn’t just try BB stores for different components, I’ve also visited different electrical wholesale supply stores in my travels. Why is it just about all this stuff is just available in grey? When I find things in white or black, which is mostly in BB stores, the covers are crap either being flimsy or not really condusive to heavy gauge wire bends inside the in-use covers.

    If this location I wanted to install this wasn’t so highly visible and the outlet there of little potential usage, I wouldn’t be so fussy, but I do want 20A right outsidde that door entrance where I’d be installing it and a face mount big grey box there would look like crap and be a real eyesore. I’ll get it all together one day, I always do, just that I never thought this one would be such a PITA just finding the right components combo.

    We should actually stop yik-yakin this one back and forth and get back to Teal Talk Sami. I’ll bring it all back up one day in an appropriate thread when I get on this task again.

    #707064

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I guess I need to brush up on my Japanese, since I couldn’t find where the video was in that link, but thank you for posting it all the same,

    Well here I pulled it out and here it is again.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #707071

    CB
    Pro

    Well here I pulled it out and here it is again.

    Thanks Dirty. I watched several related videos in “Japanese” following your link. Quite interesting, and other than the western / American “muzak” in the background of a couple of them, the tool comparison videos in Japan are far more enjoyable to watch, as the camera point of view remains focused on the tool being compared, not the tool talking.

    I can’t stand the (typically American) youtubers who have the camera pointed at their face and up their nose all the time. I just don’t get it. Why do they think their viewership needs or wants to look at them? If the title to the video is about a drill, then let’s just see the drill please thank you. The Japanese get this. None of the Japanese videos on the TD171D aka DTD171 in breaking torque comparisions to the TW285D showed a face. They kept the camera pointed to the activity, not the actor.

    And as such, they were more informative, in less time. Thanks again!

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