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12V to 120V

This topic contains 30 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  theamcguy 1 year, 6 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 21 through 31 (of 31 total)
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  • #542425

    Anonymous

    One small issue to not forget is weight, specifically tongue weight. Batteries are dense.

    If you can, put them as close to, or behind, the axle(s) and as low as possible to keep the center of gravity low and the sway down. Balance to the middle if you can.

    Cant find the link now, but I saw someone who replaced the water tank with a bank of batteries and put in a hatch in the floor to get to it. Nice upgrade if you dont use the tank (I dont)

    Wow I would never remove the water tank for a battery lol, That’s just crazy talk man. Of course adding weight over the axles is the best policy but ya can’t put it all over the axles lol, And you don’t want batteries inside. They must be vented to the outside……..Most travel trailers have them outside on the tongue, I added two 6volt batteries to the tongue of my enclosed toy hauler with no problem. And bought a sweet battery box to put them in, Sure it added tongue weight but that’s why they make ‘weight distribution’ (equalizer) hitches. And trucks to pull a trailer LOL….

    Good point. Glad I never made the change. Although it is worth noting that the water tank is under the trailer, not inside.

    The various parts of my water tank rotted out years ago, and it had a couple of hundred pounds of stangnant water in the bottom of it, due to lots of cracks that let splashed water in.
    Since I never used my tank, I just pulled it all out and capped it off. Worked for me.

    I guess not having a water tank would be ok IF you only camp at places with full hook-ups, Hopefully you left the lines intact enough to be able to hook up a water hose?? Otherwise you can’t even use the toilet

    Yup – I have full access to “shore water” but no tank. Also, its a popup, so its a chemical toilet

    Oh ok gotcha, Well in that case you don’t really need another battery. Just plug it in to shore power, And you probably don’t have electric trailer brakes so no need for the little emergency break-away battery either.

    It’s kinda like what they call a ‘Park Model’ camper, They don’t have any batteries or holding tanks at all. And they don’t have RV style fridges or stoves either, It’s all household type appliances and can only be used at camp grounds that have full hook-ups. Not a bad idea IF someone plans on using it at full hook-up camp grounds only, and they seem to be cheaper than a real self contained camper.

    #542427

    One small issue to not forget is weight, specifically tongue weight. Batteries are dense.

    If you can, put them as close to, or behind, the axle(s) and as low as possible to keep the center of gravity low and the sway down. Balance to the middle if you can.

    Cant find the link now, but I saw someone who replaced the water tank with a bank of batteries and put in a hatch in the floor to get to it. Nice upgrade if you dont use the tank (I dont)

    Wow I would never remove the water tank for a battery lol, That’s just crazy talk man. Of course adding weight over the axles is the best policy but ya can’t put it all over the axles lol, And you don’t want batteries inside. They must be vented to the outside……..Most travel trailers have them outside on the tongue, I added two 6volt batteries to the tongue of my enclosed toy hauler with no problem. And bought a sweet battery box to put them in, Sure it added tongue weight but that’s why they make ‘weight distribution’ (equalizer) hitches. And trucks to pull a trailer LOL….

    Good point. Glad I never made the change. Although it is worth noting that the water tank is under the trailer, not inside.

    The various parts of my water tank rotted out years ago, and it had a couple of hundred pounds of stangnant water in the bottom of it, due to lots of cracks that let splashed water in.
    Since I never used my tank, I just pulled it all out and capped it off. Worked for me.

    I guess not having a water tank would be ok IF you only camp at places with full hook-ups, Hopefully you left the lines intact enough to be able to hook up a water hose?? Otherwise you can’t even use the toilet

    Yup – I have full access to “shore water” but no tank. Also, its a popup, so its a chemical toilet

    Oh ok gotcha, Well in that case you don’t really need another battery. Just plug it in to shore power, And you probably don’t have electric trailer brakes so no need for the little emergency break-away battery either.

    It’s kinda like what they call a ‘Park Model’ camper, They don’t have any batteries or holding tanks at all. And they don’t have RV style fridges or stoves either, It’s all household type appliances and can only be used at camp grounds that have full hook-ups. Not a bad idea IF someone plans on using it at full hook-up camp grounds only, and they seem to be cheaper than a real self contained camper.

    Somewhere in-between actually. It does have brakes, and the fridge is a 3-way (propane, AC, and DC). Since I often drive for 2-3 days to a campground, I have considered installing a vehicle panel on the roof to charge the battery so I can run the fridge when my car is off (otherwise it runs off the car battery/alternator)

    In my case, I dont always use it in campgrounds, but I also dont want to drive with a big tank of water sloshing around, so that tank never gets used. Either I have a tap to hose up to, or I have no running water in the camper, and live the life of a tenter. Fridge and furnace can run off propane when I dont have AC, but I dont like using that option while driving (also, pretty not allowed)

    #542437

    Anonymous

    I do run my fridge on propane while traveling, The only bad thing about doing that is if ya crash the propane tanks are on. Still no problem unless ya crash bad enough it could break a propane line and possibly cause a fire, But I figure if ya crash that bad it’s totaled anyway lol……

    Are the brakes surge or electric? If electric then normally you’ll have a little battery for the break-away thing but it’s usually just for that and isn’t wired for anything else, and the tow vehicle doesn’t charge it either. It needs to be charged once in a while manually with a charger…

    You could add a bigger deep cycle 12v battery to it and eliminate the little break-away one, and wire it up to charge from the tow vehicle while driving. And to also do the break-away thing and run whatever ya need in the camper. That’s how I did my enclosed trailer

    #542709

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    You could add a bigger deep cycle 12v battery to it and eliminate the little break-away one, and wire it up to charge from the tow vehicle while driving. And to also do the break-away thing and run whatever ya need in the camper. That’s how I did my enclosed trailer

    I beleive there are kits at trailer/RV supply stores. They can help you get what you need.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    #572572

    Masterbosch
    Pro
    Wayne, NJ

    When you converting 12 to 120v you Def need a deep cycle battery. It’s also better to put a capacitor which stabling the current even better. I have 35 farad capacitor and optima deep cycle 127 amp battery. I can run it with out problem.even though I don’t have a converter I had a big music system which I removed from the car recently.

    plusoneconstructionllc@gmail.com

    #576646

    MTRoads
    Pro
    Near Glacier National Park, MT

    Converting to a pair of 6V batteries was mentioned earlier – I second that and highly recommend it.

    Our 5th-wheel came with a pair of 12V batteries and would typically last 2 days maximum (almost all of our camping is out in the boonies with no hookups). If we were camping over a long weekend we had to make sure we packed the generator along to recharge the batteries.

    After some research I decided to switch to a pair of 6V batteries – we can now do a 4-day weekend with no problems on just the batteries.

    Stan
    From the Northwest corner of Montana.

    #631474

    Impressive, Nice guide, Liked the suggestions here.

    #631506

    Impressive, Nice guide, Liked the suggestions here.

    I had fogotten this thread. And now Im doing some of the modifications listed to my trailer. Funny how that works out

    #631570

    WoodsConstruction
    Pro
    Sudbury, ON

    Impressive, Nice guide, Liked the suggestions here.

    I had fogotten this thread. And now Im doing some of the modifications listed to my trailer. Funny how that works out

    I just brought mine back from my friends camp where I stored it. Now it’s time to dig out the inverter I bought, get a second battery, and mount the solar panels & charge controller. Only used one panel last year but I bought a set of two so why not.

    #631593

    kurt@welkerhomes.com
    Pro
    Owatonna, MN - Minnesota

    I really like the idea of an inverter on a truck to have 120 v power. you really need at least 2000 w to make it effective however.

    #631629

    theamcguy
    Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

    I really like the idea of an inverter on a truck to have 120 v power. you really need at least 2000 w to make it effective however.

    Good point Kurt. Not only is the voltage important but the watts as well. Get a quality unit and make sure your alternator can handle the increased load.

    Automotive Pro
    Fayetteville, NC

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