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12” Power Miter Saw

This topic contains 39 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  Doobie 6 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 21 through 40 (of 40 total)
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  • #705834

    redwood
    Pro

    Hitachi also make a very good sliding miter saw. In fact Hitachi invented the sliding miter saw. They are not a lot of money too.

    Do you have proof of that? I had a Delta Sawbuck, that I thought was the first.

    Yes that tool has been around forever. I don’t think it is a sliding miter saw tho?? Maybe a mini radial arm saw?

    I think it fits the definition of a sliding miter saw, it just doesn’t have the vertical capacity. It actually was a very good saw for siding and decks.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #705866

    Doobie
    Pro

    The thing that really irked me, was I couldn’t even buy a parts diagram for the saw.

    Isn’t the exploded view on the Kapex on the Festool EKAT website is what you were looking for?

    http://ekat.festool.de/login/jsp/main.jsp?doAction=start&autologin=true&userId=US-Kunde-FT_US&password=Customer&design=festool

    Sorry, no direct link to the exploded parts view, but you can click around to get to this view I snippeted.

    #705897

    redwood
    Pro

    The thing that really irked me, was I couldn’t even buy a parts diagram for the saw.

    Isn’t the exploded view on the Kapex on the Festool EKAT website is what you were looking for?

    http://ekat.festool.de/login/jsp/main.jsp?doAction=start&autologin=true&userId=US-Kunde-FT_US&password=Customer&design=festool

    Sorry, no direct link to the exploded parts view, but you can click around to get to this view I snippeted.

    I apologize, I was actually looking for a service manual. It’s been a few years.

    Mark E.

    Pioneer, CA

    Working Pro 1972 - 2015
    Member since Jan 22, 2013
    www.creative-redwood-designs.com

    #705899

    Doobie
    Pro

    The thing that really irked me, was I couldn’t even buy a parts diagram for the saw.

    Isn’t the exploded view on the Kapex on the Festool EKAT website is what you were looking for?

    http://ekat.festool.de/login/jsp/main.jsp?doAction=start&autologin=true&userId=US-Kunde-FT_US&password=Customer&design=festool

    Sorry, no direct link to the exploded parts view, but you can click around to get to this view I snippeted.

    I apologize, I was actually looking for a service manual. It’s been a few years.

    That I have a feeling you are right Mark in that Festool does not release any kind of ‘service’ manual. But how many tool manufacturers do for that matter? I honestly have no clue as I’ve never sought one that I can recall other than maybe for my old Sears Craftsman garage door opener when I was doing a guts/gears retrofit on it years ago to bring it back to snuff. I recall there was instructions that came along with the service retrofit kit on that one.

    #705921

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I think it fits the definition of a sliding miter saw,

    Okay

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #706126

    Warren6810
    Pro
    Akron, OH

    I still have two of the older model Hitachi 8 1/4 inch saws. I also have an older Milwaukee, the Bosch Axial, and the new Dewalt 60v. I really do love the Bosch, and have used it quite a bit. Just got the Dewalt, but haven’t used it yet. It is very heavy, but looks very well build. Being able to go cordless was my biggest reason for getting it.

    #706128

    CB
    Pro

    The following might be true of any sliding compound miter saw, but it is especially true with the Bosch 12″ glide saw: These saws are not immune to the physical influence of the operator during the cut, especially during a gliding or sliding cut.

    The operator’s arm motion and grip can exert enough pressure or lateral shift to induce inaccuracies adrift of the intended cut line as great as 3/32″, depending on the width of the material that is being cross cut.

    This isn’t necessarily a deal breaker, and in fact can be an advantage in some cases. I work with pre-existing structures, where off the bat, there are few perfectly perpendicular corners. The ravages of time, weather, earthquakes, timber twist from wood water content evaporation, heating and cooling cycles, rot, sun, water penetrations, sloppy tape and texture, previous occupant escapades… nothing is really perfectly straight anymore, even if it ever was at one time.

    So knowing that as an operator I can exert an influence over the accuracy of a miter cut in a compound sliding or gliding saw, and especially a gliding saw, I tend to take advantage of the lack of absolute precision in the mechanism of the machine in order to “cheat” angles where needed… as subtle compensatory tweaks to make angles meet flush, where the substrate supporting the trim isn’t quite square.

    I didn’t find as much “flexibility” in the carriage of the radial arm saw I used previously. Whatever saw you chose, be sure to explore the physics of the sliding or gliding mechanism both absentmindedly (with power off) and with the exertion of force, and look for the range of variance in how the blade intersects with the table slot. You will be able to feel if accuracy is something you can physically control or not with that particular saw.

    This is a point that I wish I had better understood when I made the transition from fixed miter saw + radial saw to sliding compound miter saw. But I eventually learned, the hard way, which is the only way that lessons seem to stick. Hopefully, these comments will help someone else learn the easier way.

    #706544

    DIYPro
    Pro

    Wow, these are great information, I truly appreciate your input as I learned allot.

    I personally don’t think cordless machine is going to have enough power, I will purchase corded system. I was trying to deride on 10” vs 12” equipment. For years I had 10” equipment worked well for me. Several occasions I needed to cut 10”, 12” wide bords where I could not use my miter saw.

    The weight of the 12” machine concerns me, as I need somewhat portability; perhaps I should stick with 10” equipment. Use the table saw for wider boards.

    That being said, what the the best 10” machine out there?

    #706556

    Doobie
    Pro

    The weight of the 12” machine concerns me, as I need somewhat portability; perhaps I should stick with 10” equipment. Use the table saw for wider boards.

    The weight differential is usually negligeble between a 10 inch versus a 12 inch model by the same brand and series. In the case of the 10 or 12 inch Bosch Axial glide saws, they weigh 64 and 65 lbs respectively.

    That being said, what the the best 10” machine out there?

    I firmly believe it is the Festool Kapex. Others will undoubtedly disagree as previously posted, but all opinions depend quite often on the criterias of its user. For me, it’s the Kapex despite its hurtfully high price tag.

    #706563

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    I personally don’t think cordless machine is going to have enough power,

    Yea,, I’m old school too but the batteries today are getting very good! Heck soon they will be running cars off of them.

    That being said, what the the best 10” machine out there?

    The Mikita is a very good unit and for a 10″ saw it has a lot of depth of cut to it.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #706569

    DIYPro
    Pro

    These are all great information, I learned allot. All of these brings up a concern with the 12” machine which is the weigh . It looks like with the glider type of 10” equipment I will be able to cut 2”x12” which is sufficient for my projects.

    That being said, I need to determine the best equipment among 10” machines.
    Thanks

    #706628

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    Hitachi also make a very good sliding miter saw. In fact Hitachi invented the sliding miter saw. They are not a lot of money too.

    Hitachi also make a very good sliding miter saw.

    I have heard that Hitachi has a good mitre saw. I don’t know much about them other then I have seen a few Youtubers have them in their shops.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #706661

    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    I personally don’t think cordless machine is going to have enough power

    there are already quite a few brands which released cordless units and they are pretty powerful.

    That being said, what the the best 10” machine out there?

    There is no such as “the best”, every unit has something what someone does not like. 😛

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
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    Palm Springs, CA

    #706682

    GTokley
    Pro
    Madoc, ON

    There is no such as “the best”, every unit has something what someone does not like.

    I would have agree with you on this. Which one person might think is the best saw. Maybe not be the same for other person.

    I would think that cordless have plenty of power.

    Greg

    instagram.com/gregtokley/

    #706761

    madman_us
    Pro
    Palm Springs, CA

    There is no such as “the best”, every unit has something what someone does not like.

    I would have agree with you on this. Which one person might think is the best saw. Maybe not be the same for other person.

    I would think that cordless have plenty of power.

    and there are some reviews about tool which are completely bias, some folks receive free tools and talk only good about it, even though there are negative things about it or something what is not good

    "If you're going to do something, do it right the first time"
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    Instagram
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    Palm Springs, CA

    #706784

    Doobie
    Pro

    ….there are some reviews about tool which are completely bias, some folks receive free tools and talk only good about it, even though there are negative things about it or something that is not good

    This is all so true nowadays. Worse are ghost writers/reviewers for manufacturers that are actually non-users who spew out completely false experiences of their own and are paid to do just phoney reviews.

    #706824

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    These are all great information, I learned allot. All of these brings up a concern with the 12” machine which is the weigh . It looks like with the glider type of 10” equipment I will be able to cut 2”x12” which is sufficient for my projects.

    That being said, I need to determine the best equipment among 10” machines.
    Thanks

    Ms.DIYPro you did a lot of beautiful work on your home. Did you and your hubby do all that work. @diypro

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #706869

    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    Honolulu,, Hi.

    Dirty

    A Working Pro since 1988!

    Member since January 26, 2013.

    #706875

    CB
    Pro

    It looks like with the glider type of 10” equipment I will be able to cut 2”x12” which is sufficient for my projects.

    That being said, I need to determine the best equipment among 10” machines.
    Thanks

    If you only plan on cross cutting 2×12 perpendicularly at 90 degree angles, then yes, that is the maximum the 10″ glide can cut in a single pass. But, that is only at 0 degrees bevel, 0 degrees miter.

    Obviously, when mitering, the cross cut capacity reduces… down to 8″ at 45 degrees. Add in a right bevel, and the material height reduces to 1″, due to the clearance of hard saw head parts. Combinations of bevel and miter cuts will not accommodate a 2×12 in one pass, sometimes on with two dimensions of interference.

    So the “best” saw for your situation will take into consideration the type of cuts you want to make… not just the material size you want to cut. The same will hold true for the crown moulding, and how you might prefer to stand it up against the fence versus laying it flat on the deck… depending on the fit up angles you need to make.

    I needed a 12″ for what I wanted to cut, and the angles I wanted to cut it in, for single pass swipes at my material. Sacrificial fences, and raised blocks along the table, combined with cut angle planning and repositioning, can stretch the reach of a 10″ some. But I like the flexibility that the extra inch of radius in the 12″ has given me.

    #707337

    Doobie
    Pro

    So @diypro, have you made a decision which 10in miter saw you will be getting?

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