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Japanese vs Western Handsaws

This topic contains 28 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Dan woodman_412 1 year, 3 months ago.

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 29 total)
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  • #15466
    Profile photo of Dan
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    Do you prefer a Japanese or western style handsaw? What makes you like one or the other or both?

    #15479
    Profile photo of Jeff
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    good topic dan, ive been using japanese saws for about 8 years now. i use japanese saws more often, mostly for finish work type cuts. i have the lee valley folding model and a cheap one for siding in my siding bucket buddy and a silky gomboy folding saw in my interior trim kit. their amazing.. they cut very fast and very clean with a tiny kerf

    the only thing i use a western saw for anymore is cutting icf block. western sawa almost feel alien to me now that ive been using japanse saws so long

    putting down subfloor with glue and screws, so i called dr smith and the robot too!
    #15481
    Profile photo of Dan
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    I’m with you Jeff. I very rarely use a western style saw. Japanese saws are so much more efficient and make a better cut. I have the folding Lee Valley saw too in my tool bag and I have the rip tooth dozuki that I use in my shop. The only thing I prefer about a western saw sometimes is how the handle registers in your hand. I have a Lie-Nielsen dovetail saw that is a very nice saw but I usually end up using the dozuki instead just because of how it cuts. Cutting on the pull stroke just feels natural now.

    #15489
    Profile photo of John S
    supimeister
    Moderator

    how much do touch-up do you do after using the japanese hand saws?

    John S
    #15511
    Profile photo of Dan
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    A lot of times no touch up work. In the case of cutting dovetails the cut line is the finished line. The fine Japanese saws produce such a fine kerf and clean line that if you cut accurately on your line there is no need to touch it up.

    #15546
    Profile photo of Jeff
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    dans right, japanese pull saws have a razor like finish because the blade is so thin

    putting down subfloor with glue and screws, so i called dr smith and the robot too!
    #15573
    Profile photo of Dan
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    The only downside of a lot of Japanese saws is you can’t sharpen them yourself due to the complex tooth geometry. They usually stay sharp for quite awhile though so it’s not too much of an issue.

    #15913
    Profile photo of John S
    supimeister
    Moderator

    thats crazy. they just look so funky i was always skeptical, haha!

    Dan – the folding japanese saw you like at lee valley is around $45, right?

    John S
    #15948
    Profile photo of Dan
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    John, the folding saw that I have is $34.90 at Lee Valley and the product # is 60T56.01 The saw that I have in my shop that’s my favorite is this one.

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=48338&cat=1,42884,42898

    #15968
    Profile photo of Jeff
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    the two folding saws that i use are

    A)

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=69152&cat=1,42884,69154

    and the other one isnt listed for some reason. hmmm

    putting down subfloor with glue and screws, so i called dr smith and the robot too!
    #15974
    Profile photo of John S
    supimeister
    Moderator

    thanks for the links guys!

    John S
    #15977
    Profile photo of Jeff
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    no problem john, that silke saw i have is amazing

    putting down subfloor with glue and screws, so i called dr smith and the robot too!
    #15986
    Profile photo of Dan
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    What kind of saw is the other one you have Jeff? Is it a discontinued model?

    #16021
    Profile photo of Jeff
    jkirk
    Moderator
    halifax, nova scotia

    its the lee valley one with the wood handle and a boat carved into the handle.. they use to have it in the display cabinet. you would know the one dan i just dont see it listed on the site

    putting down subfloor with glue and screws, so i called dr smith and the robot too!
    #16024
    Profile photo of Dan
    woodman_412
    Moderator

    I don’t remember that one Jeff, I just looked back in my old catalogs too and didn’t see anything like that. Do you have a pic of it?

    #16787
    Profile photo of John S
    supimeister
    Moderator

    jeff – do you sharpen it yourself?

    John S
    #27715
    Profile photo of Boyd
    Dabbs
    Moderator

    Gee, Looks like something I saw at the Blue Hashi Sushi restaurant the other day LOL. Seriously though, Cutting on the pull stroke sounds so weird to me, Seems like it would be harder to stay on the line??

    #35780
    Profile photo of Dirty
    DirtyWhiteBoy
    Pro
    HonoluluHawaii, 394,864

    Jeff wrote:the two folding saws that i use are

    A)

    http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=69152&cat=1,42884,69154

    and the other one isnt listed for some reason. hmmm

    WoW,,,,,How come I don’t have one of those You been holding out????????????

    #35784
    Profile photo of John S
    supimeister
    Moderator

    Boyd – I have found that cutting on the pull stroke is really quite easy to stay on the line! It is a little different but doesn’t take that long to adapt

    John S
    #35861
    Profile photo of Jerry
    jdw1865
    Pro
    Skiatook, OK

    Cutting on the pull stroke is inherently easier think pulling trailer vs pushing a trailer. That being said I haven’t made the switch yet.

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